GRADUATE POSITIONS IN INVASION ECOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO – APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN

Peter M. Kotanen
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto Mississauga

 I am looking for new Ph.D. and M.Sc. students to start work in 2019. My lab studies the ecology of plants and their natural enemies (herbivores and pathogens) in Ontario and elsewhere. Recent work has centred on the effects of insects and soil pathogens on non-native species, and whether damage depends on latitude, population isolation, and other factors. I’m also planning new projects studying factors setting northern range limits of invaders, and investigating herbivore tolerance of invasive species. Information on our research can be found at my home page: www.utm.utoronto.ca/~w3pkota.

We are a thriving department at a leading research institution, with excellent resources and many opportunities for interaction and collaboration. All graduate students are guaranteed a stable minimum income, currently $26,750 from a variety of sources, which provides for tuition (ca. $8500) and living expenses ($18,250). Additional support is available for research and conference travel. Information on application procedures and our tri-campus graduate program can be found at our grad student website, http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/grad.htm. This year, we are inviting applications for Canadian M.Sc. and Ph.D. candidates and a limited number of foreign Ph.D. positions. Application are now open, and we will begin to review them in January 2019 for start dates in the summer or fall of 2019. Interested students should first contact me via e-mail: peter.kotanen@utoronto.ca.

Some recent publications: 

  • Nunes & Kotanen (2018) Does local isolation allow an invasive thistle to escape enemy pressure? Oecologia 188: 139-147.
  • Nunes & Kotanen (2018) Comparative impacts of aboveground and belowground enemies on an invasive thistle. Ecology and Evolution 8: 1430-1440.
  • Fitzpatrick, Gehant, Kotanen, & Johnson (2017) Phylogenetic relatedness, phenotypic similarity, and plant-soil feedbacks. Journal of Ecology 105: 786-800.
  • Anstett, Nunes, Baskett, & Kotanen (2016) Sources of controversy surrounding latitudinal patterns in herbivory and defence. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 10: 789-802.
  • Kambo & Kotanen (2014) Latitudinal trends in herbivory and performance of an invasive species, common burdock (Arctium minus). Biological Invasions 16: 101-112.

Peter M. Kotanen
Dept. of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto Mississauga
3359 Mississauga Road
Mississauga, ON, L5L 1C6 CANADA
e-mail: peter.kotanen@utoronto.ca
www.utm.utoronto.ca/~w3pkota

[This notice may be downloaded at http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/~w3pkota/students_wanted_2018.pdf]

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