PhD Positions in Fungal Evolutionary Genetics

The Corradi Lab is currently seeking motivated graduate students (MSc or PhD level).

Students will be supervised by Dr. Nicolas Corradi within a CIFAR (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) – affiliated laboratory located in the Department of Biology of the University of Ottawa, Canada.

Lab Website: http://corradilab.weebly.com/

The selected candidates will pursue and expand work in one of several new exciting research areas in the lab:

1) Environmental genomics of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

2) Metagenomics of eukaryotic intracellular pathogens (Microsporidia, Rozellomycota)

3) Genome and mating-type organization in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal FungiEnquiries about specific projects can be sent to ncorradiATuottawa.ca.

Applicants are expected to have good background in one (or more) of the following areas:

Mycology, Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, Plant-microbe interaction, Amplicon-sequencing analysis, Population Genetics/omics, Comparative genomics.

For international applicants, Fluency in French is desired (but not required). 

A complete application package includes 1) a CV, 2) a short description of past research accomplishments and future goals, and 3) the names and e-mail addresses of at least 2 references. Evaluation of applications starts immediately until suitable candidates are found.

The University of Ottawa is a large, research-intensive university, hosting over 40.000 students and located in the downtown core area of Canada’s capital city (http://www.science.uottawa.ca/fac/welcome.html). Ottawa is a vibrant, multicultural city with a very high quality of life (http://www.ottawatourism.ca/fr/)Complete applications can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradiATuottawa.ca).

Representative Publications:

  1. Corradi N. and A. Brachmann. Fungal mating in the most widespread plant symbionts? Trends in Plant Sciences 2017, 22 (2), 175–183
  2. Ropars J., Kinga Sędzielewska Toro K. Noel J., Pelin A., Charron P., Farinelli L., Marton T., Krüger M., Fuchs J., Brachmann, and N. Corradi. Evidence for the sexual origin of heterokaryosis in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi. Nature Microbiology 1(6): 16033, 2016.
  3. Corradi N. Microsporidia: Intracellular Parasites Shaped by Gene Loss and Horizontal Gene Transfer. Annual Review of Microbiology 69 (1): 167-183. 2015
  4. Pelin A., Selman M., Laurent Farinelli, Aris-Brosou and N. Corradi. Genome analyses suggest the presence of polyploidy and recent human-driven expansions in eight global populations of the honeybee pathogen Nosema ceranaeEnvironmental Microbiology 17 (11): 4443-4458, 2015.
  5. Riley R.Charron P., Idnurm A., Farinelli L., Dalpé Y., Martin F. and Corradi. Extreme Diversification of the MATA-HMG Gene Family in the Plant – Associated Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi. New Phytologist 201(1): 254–268, 2014.
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Ph.D. & M.Sc. Positions – Fisheries productivity in northern boreal lakes

Enthusiastic, team oriented, and self-motivated students are encouraged to apply for a Ph.D. and MSc positions to conduct research on fisheries productivity in boreal freshwater ecosystems. This project is a multi-disciplinary collaboration between the University of Alberta, industry, government and other sponsors. The main project goals include: i) community assembly in boreal lakes, ii) modelling food-web dynamics, iii) effects of climate change on fish production, iv) determining best practices in monitoring and measuring, v) primary production in lakes, and vi) developing field based studies to determine causative relationships between age and growth and other life history characteristics in relation to differing lake environments. These research projects are fully funded and will provide key insights into how to develop habitat offsets for fisheries, a new and emerging field in restoration and conservation biology. Applicants will be under the supervision of Dr. Mark Poesch, but will interact regularly with scientists and team members in industry, provincial and federal governments.

Ph.D. applicants must have a graduate degree in Biology, Ecology, Zoology, Evolutionary Biology, or a related field. Ideally, the same would be an asset for MSc applicants. Applicant must have a high overall GPA (especially in related courses). Experience with ecological modeling, freshwater fish ecology, database management, and programming skills are considered an asset. Applicants should clearly articulate how this research will build on your existing experience, specific skills and provide a date of availability. Applicants interested in this position, please send an email to Dr. Mark Poesch (poesch(at)ualberta.ca) with a cover letter identifying research interests, CV, transcripts (unofficial accepted), writing sample, and a list of three references.

Please note review of applications will commence on May 1, 2017 and the competition will remain open until the position is filled. The ideal start date is September 1, 2017, but other arrangements (for earlier or later start dates) can be made.

The University of Alberta was recently rated as Canada’s fourth best university, and 86th across universities worldwide. Located in Alberta’s capital city, Edmonton (population of 1.2 million people), the University of Alberta provides a dynamic mixture of a large research intensive university, urban culture and recreation. More than 39,000 students from across Canada and 144 other countries participate in nearly 400 programs and 18 faculties.

Contact Information:

Dr. Mark Poesch
Assistant Professor, Conservation Ecology
University of Alberta, Department of Renewable Resources
751 General Services Building, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2H1
Ph: 780-492-4827
Email: Poesch(at)ualberta.ca
Website: www.markpoesch.com

Graduate (MSc or PhD) Student Opportunities at the University of Alberta: Response of Soil Microbial Communities to Grazing Management

Grasslands provide valuable ecosystem services such as forage, wildlife habitat, and decreased soil erosion and are responsible for storing 30% of all soil carbon. Soil microbial communities comprise a large fraction of underground biomass in grasslands and mediate ecosystem functioning by facilitating nutrient cycling and energy flow. These microbial communities are the major drivers of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, and are responsible for associated losses from the soil system, mainly as greenhouse gases (GHGs). Specific rangeland management practices, such as adaptive multi-paddock grazing, may promote soil carbon sequestration and offset greenhouse gases produced by beef production. Grazing imposes a significant impact on grasslands by defoliating plants, altering the plant community, reducing plant litter, and changing water and nutrient cycles; repeated defoliation may favour specific grass species that alter biochemical inputs to the soil and influence soil microbial community composition.

We are looking to hire 2 to 3 motivated graduate students (MSc or PhD) to work on a project examining soil carbon storage and greenhouse gas emissions from soil microbial communities in prairie ecosystems under adaptive multi-paddock (AMP) grazing management. The students will work in grasslands throughout AB, SK and MB through a large-scale project funded through the Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Program and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. Candidates should have a keen interest in studying soil microbial communities via phospholipid (PLFA) and molecular methods (DNA/RNA extractions, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), qPCR of taxonomic and functional gene and transcripts, illumina miseq amplicon library preparation, bioinformatics). Students will be supervised by Cameron Carlyle and/or Edward Bork at the University of Alberta and will work with an interdisciplinary group of researchers (range management specialists, plant ecologists, soil scientists, bio-geochemists, microbial ecologists), and individual ranchers across Canada and the USA. A large portion of research will require students to work on field sites throughout the Canadian prairies. A willingness to work extended hours while in the field is required. Experience in soil and molecular analyses are strong assets. A full (non-probationary) driver’s license is required. Students could begin as early as May 2017, but no later than September 2017. If interested, please submit a cover letter and CV detailing relevant interests and experiences to Karen Thompson at karen4@ualberta.ca.

BOURSE de DOCTORAT pour étudier la contribution du caribou comme espèce parapluie en forêt boréale soumise aux changements climatiques

Le caribou forestier est une espèce parapluie puisque de récents travaux démontrent que plus on aménage son habitat d’une façon qui lui est présentement favorable, mieux on préserve la biodiversité régionale. Suite aux changements climatiques, il est toutefois possible que différentes mesures soient préconisées pour l’aménagement de l’habitat de l’espèce, et que sa contribution comme parapluie de la biodiversité boréale varie suivant ces changements. Le projet doctoral vise à établir le lien entre les changements climatiques, l’aménagement de l’habitat du caribou forestier et son rôle comme espèce parapluie. L’approche empirique impliquera notamment l’étude des interactions entre des caribous forestiers et des loups gris porteurs de colliers GPS le long de transects latitudinaux positionnés au Québec et en Alberta (Canada). Cette information sera mise en relation avec des données de biodiversité animale et végétale inventoriée le long de ces mêmes transects. Les conditions observées le long de ces transects serviront en partie de substitut aux changements climatiques. Des modèles de prévision des changements climatiques seront utilisés afin d’explorer les conséquences de ces changements sur le rôle du caribou forestier comme espèce parapluie. La majorité des données sont donc déjà acquise, de sorte que le doctorant(e) se concentrera largement sur l’analyse des données et la simulation informatique. Il y est néanmoins possible des travaux de terrain supplémentaires prennent place.

Nous sommes à la recherche d’un(e) étudiant(e) au doctorat pour participer à cette étude. L’étudiant joindra un groupe de recherche composé de biologistes, de statisticiens et physiciens qui travaillent conjointement au développement de méthodes permettant d’anticiper les variations des écosystèmes nordiques suivant les changements climatiques. Le candidat idéal devrait avoir une maîtrise en biologie, de même que certaines connaissances en géomatique et de bonnes aptitudes en statistique. L’étudiant(e) sera sous la co-supervision de Daniel Fortin (U. Laval) et Mark Hebblewhite (U. of Montana).

Une bourse de 18 000$/année sera disponible durant 3 ans. Des bourses universitaires s’ajouteront à ce montant. Les étudiant(e)s admissibles aux bourses
CRSNG et FRQNT seront favorisé(e)s.

Documents à fournir par courriel : Si le projet vous intéresse, veuillez faire parvenir une courte lettre spécifiant vos motivations, un CV, vos relevés de notes (non officiels), ainsi que le nom et adresse électronique de trois personnes pouvant fournir des références à votre sujet. L’évaluation des candidatures débutera le 15 avril 2017.

Daniel Fortin
Département de biologie,
Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, 1045, av. de la Médecine,
Université Laval, Québec (Qc) G1V 0A6, Canada
Courriel: Daniel.Fortin@bio.ulaval.ca

PhD positions available – Amphibian occupancy patterns, population genetics, and disease dynamics

Funded by a Strategic NSERC grant, we are seeking a PhD students to complete our team on research related to the detection and monitoring of amphibians and their pathogens (chytrid fungus, ranavirus) in Canada. Using environmental DNA as a basis for the research, the team will conduct: 1) Habitat occupancy modeling for amphibians and their pathogens; 2) Analysis of the evolutionary dynamics of pathogens and amphibian hosts; 3) Assessment of potential synergistic interactions between pathogens and aquatic contaminants; and 4) Modeling the drivers of amphibian population decline. Students will develop research projects that fit within the context of the broader program, such as: Validation of eDNA for detecting amphibians; Assessment of ranavirus pathogenicity; Chytrid fungus evolutionary dynamics; and Modeling drivers of amphibian occupancy.  We are seeking students to initiate their research in Spring or Fall 2017, with the research to be conducted across southern Ontario. Interested applicants should submit a letter of interest, CV, unofficial transcripts and names of 3 references to: Dennis Murray, Trent University, dennismurray@trentu.ca (www.dennismurray@trentu.ca) or David Lesbarreres, Laurentian University dlesbarreres@laurentian.ca (http://gearg.jimdo.com/people/head/).

Bourse de DOCTORAT pour étudier les variations des assemblages d’espèces suivant les changements climatiques

Les conditions environnementales varient graduellement suivant les changements climatiques de sorte que les espèces typiques à un emplacement particulier devraient varier dans le temps. Afin de pouvoir identifier des cibles appropriées de conservation ou de restauration de la biodiversité, il est donc nécessaire de pouvoir anticiper ces changements. Ce projet de doctorat vise à développer des outils permettant d’anticiper les variations d’assemblages d’espèces végétales et animales qui prendront place suivant les changements climatiques dans des écosystèmes du nord de la forêt boréale. Le projet mettra en valeur des bases de données existantes sur les plantes vasculaires, les coléoptères et les oiseaux inventoriés le long de transects latitudinaux positionnés dans la forêt boréale du Québec et de l’Alberta (Canada). Les conditions observées le long de ces transects serviront en partie de substitut aux changements climatiques. Des travaux de terrain sont à prévoir afin de compléter l’échantillonnage des oiseaux et des coléoptères dans le nord du transect québécois.

Nous sommes à la recherche d’un(e) étudiant(e) au doctorat pour participer à cette recherche sur la biodiversité et les changements climatiques des écosystèmes nordiques. L’étudiant joindra un groupe de recherche composé de biologistes, de statisticiens et physiciens qui travaillent conjointement au développement de méthodes permettant d’anticiper les variations des écosystèmes nordiques suivant les changements climatiques. Le projet s’inscrit dans le programme Sentinelle Nord, financé par Apogée Canada.

Le candidat idéal devrait avoir une maîtrise en biologie, de même que certaines connaissances en géomatique et de bonnes aptitudes en statistique. Il aura également un intérêt pour la taxonomie car les oiseaux et les invertébrés devront être identifiés durant ou suivant les travaux de terrain. L’étudiant(e) sera sous la co-supervision de D. Fortin (biologiste, U. Laval), C. Hébert (entomologiste, Service canadien des forêts) et M. Darveau (ornithologue, Canards Illimités).

Une bourse de 18 000$/année sera disponible durant 3 ans. Des bourses universitaires s’ajouteront à ce montant. Les étudiant(e)s admissibles aux bourses CRSNG et FRQNT seront favorisés.

Documents à fournir par courriel : Si le projet vous intéresse, veuillez faire parvenir par courriel une courte lettre spécifiant vos motivations, un CV, vos relevés de notes (non officiels), ainsi que le nom et adresse électronique de trois personnes pouvant fournir des références à votre sujet. L’évaluation des candidatures débutera le 15 avril 2017.

Daniel Fortin
Département de biologie, Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, 1045, av. de la Médecine, Université Laval, Québec (Qc) G1V 0A6, Canada
Courriel: Daniel.Fortin@bio.ulaval.ca

Graduate student positions – Laurentian University

Our research lab is looking for three new graduate students, all funded.

PhD student – We are looking for a PhD student to work on questions related to the microbiome and captive populations, particularly endangered species of mammals. Funding for the student’s stipend is provided by the NSERC CREATE training program ReNewZoo (http://renewzoo.ca), and the project is a collaboration with Dr. Gabriela Mastromonaco at the Toronto Zoo. ReNewZoo is a training program for graduate students that involves a research thesis, internships at a zoo/aquarium, and a specialized on-line course. Students earn a certificate in Zoo Conservation recognized by Canada’s Accredited Zoos and Aquariums (CAZA).

MSc student – As part of a long-term small mammal-monitoring program in Alqonquin Provincial Park, we are seeking an MSc student to test hypotheses related to host-parasite interactions (fleas and their rodent hosts). Funding for the student’s stipend is provided by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF). The project is in collaboration with Dr. Jeff Bowman, Research Scientist at OMNRF.

MSc/PhD student – We have been investigating the evolutionary and physiological ecology of urban mammals, and are looking for a graduate student to continue this work. We have used eastern chipmunks and raccoons to examine phenotypic differences between wild and urban populations. Funding provided by the Canada Research Chair in Applied Evolutionary Ecology.

Our lab (http://appliedevoeco.org) is a dynamic group that is part of the Centre for Evolutionary Ecology and Ethical Conservation (CEEEC – http://ceeec.ca) at Laurentian University. Our students benefit from a highly collaborative atmosphere, where graduate students will integrate their own work with other researchers, both at Laurentian and beyond. We work on questions of both applied and theoretical interest, mostly on mammals.

Please contact Albrecht Schulte-Hostedde (aschultehostedde@laurentian.ca) if interested.

Ph. D. position with Jeff Houlahan’s lab in the Department of Biological Sciences/The Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick Saint John (UNB Saint John). Application deadline: 1 July, 2017.

The Houlahan lab is looking for a Ph.D. student interested in fundamental questions in population and/or community ecology to begin in the fall of 2017 (although later start dates could be negotiated). We are happy to hear from students with a wide range of interests – some examples of topics include (i) the relationship between diversity and stability, (ii) the relative importance of density dependent effects on population dynamics, and (iii) the stability of competitive hierarchies in nature but we are less concerned about the question than the approach. The approach would involve developing theoretical and/or statistical models that would then be tested on new data (see Houlahan et al. 2017 in Oikos) to assess the predictive ability of those models and how predictive ability changes over time and space. The successful applicant will have strong quantitative skills, and more particularly, be somebody who is comfortable analyzing data and modeling in something like R or Python. Students will have an opportunity to improve their analytical and modeling skills, become better grounded in basic ecology theory, and improve writing, logical thinking and problem-solving abilities. We are interested in ecology, environmental science, computer science and/or mathematics students. Funding of at least $21,000/year is guaranteed for 4 years and comes from TA’ships, RA’ships and scholarships.

The University of New Brunswick is a comprehensive university with campuses in Saint John and Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada with approximately 10,000 students. The Houlahan lab is part of the Department of Biological Sciences and The Canadian Rivers Institute at the Saint John campus. This is a vibrant department with a focus on aquatic and marine biology and more than 50 graduate students. Saint John is a small (pop – 68,000) attractive, coastal city in southern New Brunswick.

If you are interested in the position drop me a note at jeffhoul@unb.ca and attach your cv, transcripts (unofficial or official) and 3 references with contact info.

Expiry date: July 1, 2017.

Fully funded MSc Position: Modeling post-fire forest cover by linking species traits with fire severity

A fully funded MSc position with Dr. Azim Mallik in the Department of Biology, Lakehead University is available examining the changes in forest cover type after wildfires and prescribed burning in Pakaskwa National Park. This will be achieved by linking fire survival and regeneration traits of dominant species with fire severity. The research project is supported by the Parks Canada. The student will work closely with another MSc student performing experimental work on abiotic trait filtering by different levels of fire severity leading forest composition change. I am looking for an HBSc Forestry, Biology or Geography graduate with experience in remote sensing and GIS and interest in modeling plant regeneration traits with habitat conditions. You will link environmental variables created by high and low severity fires with species traits and predict changes in species composition.

Salary/stipend: Up to CND$25,000 per year for two years including GA

Requirements

– A thesis based (research) BSc. degree in Biology/Forestry/Geography with experience in GIS and remote sensing.
– Experience in managing and analyzing large plant and environmental data sets.
– Experience and/or willingness to learn about climate change models and use of plant traits and fire severity to predict forest cover change by climate change scenario analysis.

Apply asap via e-mail to Dr. Azim Mallik (amallik@lakeheadu.ca) with

i)  a cover letter describing your background and research experience

ii)  an up-to-date CV,

iii)  unofficial transcript(s),

iv)  example(s) of your writing (e.g. extract from your thesis, or a class project).

Graduate Student Opportunity in Evolutionary Ecology at the University of Pittsburgh

The Turcotte Lab at the University of Pittsburgh is looking for PhD students to experimentally test the dynamic interplay between rapid evolution and community ecology in the field. Using various plant and insect study systems and complementary approaches, including experimental evolution, modeling, and genetic analyses, we test cutting-edge hypotheses in Evolutionary Ecology. We are especially interested in testing how rapid phenotypic changes, both plastic and evolutionary, impact concurrent ecological dynamics and species interactions. The aim of the lab is to disentangle and quantify how ecological and evolutionary processes reciprocally impact each other and understand their importance in nature.

Please visit the lab webpage for more information www.martinturcotte.net

I am also presenting at CSEE 2017. If you would like to meet please send me an email (turcotte@pitt.edu).

The University of Pittsburgh is a leading research university and the Department of Biological Sciences is a dynamic and growing team of enthusiastic researchers and educators. The department also runs the Pymatuning Lab of Ecology, which is equipped with lab space and housing to facilitate field-based research in northwestern Pennsylvania. The City of Pittsburgh is a vibrant and beautiful place to live (info). It is often voted the ‘Most Livable city in the U.S.’ (info). All graduate students in the department are provided with a competitive stipend and benefits for 5 years through a combination of fellowships, TAships, and research assistantships. Although funding from the lab itself is available, I expect all prospective students to apply for external funding.

Prospective students should email me turcotte@pitt.edu with a short paragraph stating why you are interested in the lab and describe your past research experience. Please include your C.V., any publications, and contact information for a few references.

Mart