PHD (2) AND POSTDOC (1) POSITIONS OFFERED – People and trees: intimately connected by a shared microbiome in an urban world

AIM: Identify the direct and indirect impacts of urban tree diversity on public health to help city-planners reduce the incidence of autoimmune diseases in at-risk populations.

Because this aim is considerable, we seek to constitute a team of members with complementary interests and skills. The specific tasks of each member will be determined at hiring.

OBJECTIVES: Over a gradient of social inequalities in two Canadian cities, we will: (1) compile tree diversity indicators using advanced ground-based and 3D remote sensing approaches; (2) identify and quantify airborne microorganisms, pollen, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by urban trees; (3) measure relationships between tree diversity, microbial diversity, pollen, VOCs, and public health (i.e., prevalence of asthma and allergies). Finally, we will (4) disseminate our results through an application that will allow end-users to estimate the health value of city-planning scenarios at the neighborhood level.

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PROJET DE DOCTORAT EN GÉNÉTIQUE FORESTIÈRE – Génétique et physiologie du stress hydrique chez l’épinette blanche

Description: La migration assistée de population, qui consiste à assortir les sources génétiques de l’espèce aux conditions climatiques potentielles du futur, a été proposée comme mesure proactive pour maintenir la productivité et réduire la vulnérabilité des écosystèmes forestiers face aux changements climatiques. Les modèles de transfert de semences, qui définissent les modalités de migration assistée, doivent intégrer les risques associés aux épisodes de sècheresse.

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITION OFFERED – Research Chair on the urban forest and PaqLab, UQAM

Career goal.

To find a better job quickly (but not too quickly). And you get paid to do it!

Reason.

Your predecessors were successful.

Conditions.

Competitive salary (!) and benefits to match. In other words, Canadian academia will do anything to make sure you achieve the goal above.

Job description.

  • Pursue your own research projects, in line with the interests of the Chair and the PaqLab
  • Publish lots of papers
  • Share your skills with the students of the lab
  • Possible co-supervisions at different levels (interns, MSc, PhD)
  • Help with grant writing
  • Participate actively in the life of the lab

Prospective candidates should contact us with the following information:

  • Letter of interest – tell us why you are interested
  • CV – tell us about yourself, because it’s not just about grades
  • Contact information for two references

Informal inquiries are welcome. Position based at UQAM (Montreal) – flexible start date, but soon. Think you’re out of luck because of your background, a disability, or the way you dress? Relax, we don’t care, because innovation is born from diversity. The PaqLab offers an inclusive, equitable, respectful, healthy, and open-minded work environment (because we work there too!). I’m also a member of the Centre for Forest Research (CFR), and so will you. You are not doing this for the money, I know (!) but in case you are interested, your salary will be around 50,000$, for an initial one year contract.

Alain Paquette
Chaire de recherche sur la forêt urbaine
Centre for Forest Research (CFR)
Université du Québec à Montréal
paqlab.uqam.ca
paquette.alain@uqam.ca

Master of Science opportunity — Trent University

Conservation Value Assessment of the Boreal Forest

We are seeking an energetic, dedicated individual to conduct biogeographic research on the conservation value of the boreal forest in North America.  Starting September 2021, the student will enrol in the interdisciplinary Environmental & Life Sciences Graduate Program at Trent University.   The successful candidate will work under the supervision of Dr. James Schaefer (Trent University) and Dr. Stephen Mayor (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources & Forestry), in close collaboration with Dr. Jeff Wells (National Audubon Society).

The goal of the project is to undertake conservation value accounting of the North American boreal forest — an evaluation the importance of this biome (one of the last great, intact tracts of forest on the planet) for various taxa, with a focus on mammals, trees, and insects.  Using GIS, the student will assemble digitized range maps to estimate the proportion of the total range of each species in the biome, then apply relative abundance measures to estimate the numbers of individuals for each species in the boreal.  The result will be a description of the conservation value and stewardship responsibility for each province and territory.

Stipend: Approximately $19,477 per year for 2 years (which includes a Teaching Assistantship of $11,177 per year for 2 years)

Application deadline: Applications will be reviewed promptly, with the intent of filling this position by January 2021.

Email a letter describing your interests along with your curriculum vitae and an unofficial copy of your transcripts to Prof. James Schaefer, jschaefer@trentu.ca

Post-doc opportunity in conservation biology: species at risk (SAR) & invasive species in a Priority Place

The Rooney Lab is recruiting a PDF to apply the Conservation Standards approach to assess the threats of invasive species in wetlands of Ontario’s Priority Place, Long Point Walsingham Forest, with special emphasis on species at risk recovery
More Info: https://uwaterloo.ca/rooney-lab

Background: Environment & Climate Change Canada–Canadian Wildlife Service (ECCC-CWS) released their conservation and action plan for the Long Point Walsingham Forest Priority Place, following the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation

(https://conservationstandards.org/about/).

Invasive species were identified as a key threat to the coastal wetlands through this process, leading to the goal that 90% of the vegetation in the Coastal Wetlands be native by 2025.

Duties: Work collaboratively with partners in ECCC-CWS, Nature Conservancy of Canada, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Birds Canada to develop a strategy using the Conservation Standards. Develop a wetland monitoring program to support early detection/rapid response of novel invasive wetland plants & support the safe management of established ones. Evaluate the effects of invasive Phragmites australis management on select SAR & native vegetation recovery. Participate actively in lab learning and collaborative research endeavors, including mentoring graduate students.

  • Start date flexible, but commence by January 2022
  • $50,000/y for two years, with renewal contingent on performance

Required: PhD in Conservation Biology, Invasion Biology, or related field; a record of research excellence and scientific publishing; strong oral and written communication skills; demonstrated ability to work collaboratively with NGO and government partners; expertise in env. monitoring and assessment.

 Desired: Experience with the Conservation Standards; past successes in knowledge co-production with non-academic partners; technical skills in experimental design, community analysis, coding in R.

Instructions: Applications due July 30, 2021. Email rrooney@uwaterloo.ca, Subject: Priority Place PDF 2021; 1) cover letter stating your research interests and relevant experience; 2) a short CV noting your scientific and leadership contributions; 3) contact information for 3 references.  Only short-listed applicants will be contacted. Rooney Lab is committed to equity in hiring and BIPOC and LGBTQ2S+ individuals are encouraged to apply.

PhD project – Application of remote sensing tools for assessing boreal forest dynamics in the Yukon

The Integrative Wildlife Conservation lab at Trent University is offering a PhD project on the application of remote sensing technologies for monitoring boreal forest structure and function near Kluane Lake, Yukon. For decades we have conducted research on Canada lynx and their prey in the Kluane region, and the current project extends these investigations into the realm of vegetation and snow dynamics in this rapidly-changing northern landscape. Using a recently-acquired unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with LiDAR, multispectral, hyperspectral, thermal and RGB cameras, we will investigate: 1) how patterns of forest productivity vary dynamically across space and time; 2) sources of forest heterogeneity and resiliency to climate change and insect outbreaks; and 3) how snow conditions vary through time and affect wildlife habitat availability. In addition, this project provides several additional opportunities and potential collaborations with ongoing research related to: 4) validating cutting-edge remote sensing technologies in forest health assessment; 5) forecasting future boreal forest dynamics under climate change; and 6) relating forest characteristics to the movements and habitat selection of Canada lynx and snowshoe hares that are radio-collared with GPS transmitters. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project.

Successful candidates MUST have an MSc in Ecology, Remote Sensing, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field and quantitative skills, and an interest in working collaboratively within a large and diverse research group. Additional desirable skills include application of GIS technologies and related software, experience in drone operation, and working in remote field conditions.  Start date is ASAP.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca).

For additional details, see www.dennismurray.ca.

The position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found.

PhD project – Canada lynx population ecology and predator-prey dynamics in the Yukon

The Integrative Wildlife Conservation lab at Trent University is offering a PhD project on lynx population dynamics and foraging ecology near Kluane Lake, Yukon. Our research on lynx and their prey in the Kluane region spans decades, and the current project builds on our recent work assessing the functional response of lynx to different prey types and how such relationships are more complex than previously thought (see Chan et al. 2017, Ecology DOI:10.1002/ecy.1828; Studd, E. et al. 2021. doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.13605b.). Specifically, through lynx satellite telemetry and accelerometry, and assessment of prey distribution and abundance, we aim to understand the mechanisms driving lynx movements and population dynamics relative to their primary (snowshoe hare) and secondary (red squirrel) prey species across space and time. We have studied lynx intensively for 6 winters during a period of hare abundance and decline at Kluane, so the ongoing cyclic crash in hare numbers presents a fascinating opportunity to assess variation in lynx foraging behavior and the dynamic drivers of their relationships with prey. This research project likely will extend into additional unexplored realms including lynx foraging ecology in summer, the role of intraspecific competition on the structure of lynx functional responses, and robust lynx population estimation using new technologies and estimators. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project and collaborate with other students and researchers working on related questions in the Kluane system.

Successful candidates MUST have an MSc in Ecology, Conservation Biology, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field and quantitative skills, and an interest in working collaboratively within a large and diverse research group. Additional desirable skills include animal handling, satellite telemetry, remote sensing and GIS analysis, and working in remote field conditions, including during winter.  Start date ASAP.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca).

For additional details, see www.dennismurray.ca and www.ualberta.ca/science/about-us/contact-us/faculty-directory/stan-boutin.

The position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found.

 

 

PhD project – Snowshoe hare winter movement ecology and responses to predation risk in the Yukon

The Integrative Wildlife Conservation lab at Trent University is initiating a PhD project on the winter movement and predator-prey dynamics of snowshoe hares at Kluane Lake, Yukon. Snowshoe hares have been studied for >30 years on-site, and we are launching an assessment of the role of winter food and cover on hare movements and population dynamics. Using GPS telemetry and accelerometry, combined with detailed assessment of structural cover and food patches on the landscape, we will evaluate hare movements, habitat selection, and behaviour in relation to environmental risks (predation) and rewards (nutrition). Our recent work (Boudreau et al. 2019 doi: 10.1007/s00442-019-04500-2; Peers et al. 2020. doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-00908-4; Shiratsuru et al. 2021 doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3456) suggests that hares live on the fine edge of high risk from predation, and the new work may also involve assessing hare movement ecology in the context of energy landscapes that vary dynamically with accumulation/melt of snow in winter, and the implications of climate change on these dynamics. Because we also instrument Canada lynx with GPS collars at Kluane, there are excellent opportunities to evaluate complex predator-prey spatial interactions. An evolving interest is assessing how individual hares vary their risk-reward tradeoff through phases of the 10-year hare population cycle. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project and collaborate with other students and researchers working on related questions in the Kluane system.

Successful candidates MUST have an MSc in Ecology, Conservation Biology, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field and quantitative skills, and an interest in working collaboratively within a large and diverse research group. Additional desirable skills include animal handling, GPS telemetry, application of animal movement models, and working in remote field conditions, including during winter.  For additional details, see www.dennismurray.ca. Start date: ASAP.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca).

The position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found.

MSc position on the effects of cryopreservation of sperm for the maintenance of endangered Atlantic salmon populations

MSc position on the effects of cryopreservation of sperm for the maintenance of endangered Atlantic salmon populations

Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

We are looking for a MSc graduate student interested in working on conservation of endangered Atlantic salmon populations. The project involves research examining the potential effects cryopreservation of gametes may have on the fitness and genetics of young produced to support conservation breeding efforts. Specifically, this project will evaluate fertilization success, offspring survival and performance, and possible epigenetic effects of sperm cryopreservation. This project will occur in collaboration with Dr. Trevor Pitcher (https://pitcherlab.ca/).

The student will be based out of Dr. Laura Weir’s lab at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Dr. Weir’s broader research programme examines various aspects of the evolution of sexually-selected traits such as behaviour, morphology and sperm characteristics, within and among different mating systems in fishes. We ask fundamental evolutionary and applied approaches, and do so in a collaborative environment, with a team of undergraduate and graduate students who interact regularly with students across a variety of disciplines within the Biology Department, including those who study fish physiology and behavioural ecology.

Location: Saint Mary’s University is located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, a city of over 400,000 people and home to five universities with a vibrant student community. In addition to being a vibrant urban center, the city is surrounded by easily accessible wilderness areas, and is a hub city in the Atlantic provinces with direct connections to other cities in Eastern Canada and the Northeast United States.

Start date: September 2021

Funding: Minimum stipend of $19,000/year. Students will be encouraged to apply for external scholarships. This position is open to Canadian or international students, but tuition costs are high for non-Canadians so additional funding is required.

 

To apply: If interested, please send a CV, transcript, and a short cover letter describing your interest and experience: laura.weir@smu.ca. Deadline for applications is July 19, 2021 but applications will be reviewed as they are received. Students will be required to travel from Halifax to an on-site location during Fall 2021 and Winter/Spring 2022.

Weston Family Senior Scientist, Nature Conservancy Canada – Application deadline: July 18, 2021

Location: Flexible

Position details: Permanent, Full Time

Taking care of our environment has never been more important than it is today. The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is looking for a Weston Family Senior Scientist to join a team committed to protecting our most important natural areas and the plants and animals they sustain.

NCC is the nation’s leading not-for-profit, private land conservation organization, working to protect our most important natural areas and the species they sustain. Since 1962 NCC and its supporters have protected 14 million hectares (more than 35 million acres) of ecologically significant land across Canada. NCC takes a collaborative, science-based approach to achieve conservation success for the sake of nature and Canadians. With a national office in Toronto and seven regional offices across the country, NCC delivers results you can walk on.

Position Summary

The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) uses western science, based on the application of the scientific method through research projects, as well as Indigenous Knowledge to inform its decisions and guide its action in the conservation of biodiversity in Canada. In support of that work NCC is looking to fill the role of Weston Family Senior Scientist (WFSS) to join the Weston Family Science Program (WFSP) and the broader conservation team committed to protecting our most important natural areas and the plants and animals they sustain.

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