ASN Awards for Support of Regional Meetings in Ecology, Evolution and Behaviour

The American Society of Naturalists solicits proposals from organizers of regional meetings in the fields of ecology, evolution and behaviour. The purpose of these small awards is to promote increased participation in regional meetings that fall along the research interests supported by the ASN and to use this support as a way of recruiting new membership to ASN. The awards typically provide subsidized registration for ASN members at these regional meetings. Please note that these awards are not intended to support workshops. Previous awardees have included meetings such as SEEPEG, SEEC, EVO-WIBO, and OE3C. Organizers of regional meetings should submit a brief proposal describing the research focus of the meeting for which funds are requested as well as details of the meeting such as anticipated number of participants, meeting venue and dates.
Instructions: Proposals should include two components. One should clearly describe the (1) overlap of the regional meeting with ASN research interests, (2) extent that the support would reach out to new audiences to grow ASN’s membership, and (3) potential size of the impact on ASN membership. The second component should include a brief budget justifying the amount requested and detailing how the funds will be used. To standardize the applications, there is a strict one-page limit (US Letter size paper, 1” margins, standard [e.g., Times] 12-point font, and no more than six lines per inch) for each component (i.e., 1 page for proposal, 1 page for budget description and use of funds). We anticipate funding 4-6 awards, typically valued at $2000-$3000.

Please send proposals to the ASN Regional Society Liaison Committee Chair Rebecca Kimball (rkimball@ufl.edu) by Feb. 15, 2017.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Science review panel must tackle barriers to funding, encourage diversity

Policy commentary in “The Hill Times”, the newspaper for Parliamentarians
There is more work to do to reverse a decade of erosion of scholarship and grant support for Canadian researchers and progress toward achieving diversity in academic institutions is unacceptably slow. The fundamental scienc review panel has an opportunity to provide strong advice around improving this situation.
Posted by Jeremy Kerr, current CSEE President
FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Monarch Butterflies: Symbol or symptom?

Policy advice in “The Hill Times”, the newspaper for Parliamentarians
The decline of monarch butterflies represents more than just a fading symbol of international cooperation, it is a symptom of broader challenges confronting biological diversity. Evidence-based decisions will be critical to recovering this and other species at risk.
Posted by CSEE president Jeremy Kerr
FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Early Career Awards 2017 – call for applications

Deadline for receipt of all application materials: 13 January 2017

Award Description: The CSEE Early Career Awards recognize outstanding accomplishments and promising future research potential in ecology and evolution by scientists early in their career. Awards will be given to two candidates each year. They consist of a 10-year membership to CSEE/SCEE, $500 cash award, up to $1000 allowance for travel and accommodation to attend the CSEE meeting in Victoria, B.C., and an invitation to give a keynote lecture at the annual meeting.

Eligibility: Applicants must be active researchers in the field of ecology and evolutionary biology who received their doctorate within five years of the application deadline, not including time taken for parental leave (i.e., one year of parental leave extends the eligibility period to six years post-Ph.D.). Candidates need to be Canadian citizens, or landed immigrants, or have completed their PhD at a Canadian University, or be currently working at a Canadian University.

Application/Nomination Procedures: Candidates may apply directly or may be nominated.  Established researchers are encouraged to nominate outstanding young scientists.  Nominations must contain all of the following supporting materials in the stated order: (1) a curriculum vitae, (2) a summary of research accomplishments (maximum 2 pages), (3) a 2-page statement of research plans for the next 5 years, (4) three recent publications, (5) names and addresses of 3 referees (including the nominating scientist where applicable) who will provide supporting letters. The 3 letters of reference should be sent separately from the candidate’s nomination package. All nomination materials and reference letters must be sent as PDFs to the chair of the CSEE Awards committee, Mark Vellend (mark.vellend@usherbrooke.ca).

Time lines: The deadline for receipt of all materials including letters of reference is 13 January 2017. The recipients will be notified of the award in February and they will receive their award at the following annual meeting.

Download this information as a PDF document: csee-early-career-award-en-2017

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Make a difference: Run for CSEE Council!

Do you want to advance the profile of ecology, evolution, and conservation in Canada? Do you want to get things done on behalf of the broader community? Do have ideas, energy and a little bit of time?  Then run for CSEE Council!

The positions

With four Council members nearing the end of their terms, the Society for Ecology and Evolution is now seeking nominations for the positions of:

  1. Secretary
  2. Regular Councillor 1
  3. Regular Councillor 2
  4. Graduate Student Councillor

What the jobs entail

Councillors contribute to directing the business of the CSEE and advise the Executive Council as to how to advance the purposes of the CSEE.  These positions are not unduly time-consuming.  At the minimum, they involve two council meetings a year (in December and at the CSEE spring/summer meeting).  Councillors are occasionally asked to vote on proposals (via email) and every councillor joins at least one sub-committee (Membership, Awards, Outreach, Biodiversity & Conservation, Newsletter, or Website).  Regular Councillors are appointed for a  three-year term; Graduate Student Councillors, for a two-year term.

The Secretary is member of the Executive Council, and as such, has more responsibilities. These include communication with the membership, keeping the records and archives of the Society and the list of members, giving notice of Council meetings and the General Business meetings, administering elections, taking minutes of the Council meetings and the General Business meetings and distributing these to the Council. The Secretary is appointed for three years.

We expect Council members to become the CSEE spokesperson for their institution, which means sending the occasional internal email to advertise our summer conference or other activities.

The perks?

Being on Council is a great opportunity to play an active role in the largest scientific society in Canada – one that advocates for the importance of ecology, evolution and conservation. Of course, it also looks great on your CV, and you get to know and hang out with the rest of the cool people on the Council.

The positions are voluntary, but the CSEE provides financial help to the Graduate Student Councillor to attend the council meetings.  You have to be a CSEE member to serve on Council.

How to nominate yourself (or someone else) and nomination deadline

It’s dead easy! Email a short bio (7-10 lines about you, what you will bring to the CSEE, and what you hope to accomplish) and a headshot to the CSEE Vice-President (Isabelle Côté, imcote@sfu.ca). You can nominate someone else (if they agree).

Nominations will be accepted until 7 December 2016.

Election timeline

The nominations will be posted on the CSEE website soon after the deadline.  Elections will be held in March 2017.  New positions start at the Annual General Meeting (in May 2017).

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Policy news and updates from the CSEE President

Policy news and opportunities

by Jeremy Kerr, President

CSEE researchers at all career stages can participate in communicating their research to the public and to policy-makers but there have been challenges in bringing evidence to public and policy discussions. Remarkably, the scientific community is now being asked to add its voice to three federal consultations that are currently underway. To the extent that members have felt excluded from federal discussions in the past, these consultations represent an opportunity to make our voices heard.

It is an opportunity to put forward our best ideas. Please consider submitting something to these reviews.

Canada’s Fundamental Science Review

Minister of Science, Dr. Kirsty Duncan, has launched a panel to review the whole science funding landscape in Canada. Whether you are a student, postdoc, new or established researcher, your voice can matter. How should fundamental research evolve? The portal for submissions can be found at: http://www.examenscience.ca/ (French page) or http://www.sciencereview.ca (English page).

The Innovation Review

The second review at Innovation, Science, and Economic Development includes areas where members may wish to contribute (notably “Global Science Excellence”, and “World-leading Clusters and Partnerships” but other areas may also interest members). Please see: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/062.nsf/fra/accueil (French) or http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/062.nsf/eng/home (English) for more information.

Climate change mitigation and adaptation

Ideas for how to mitigate climate change and adapt to its impacts can be submitted to: http://parlonsactionpourleclimat.ca/ (French) or http://letstalkclimateaction.ca/ (English).

Gender diversity and equity

The society’s longstanding commitment to our Symposium for Women Entering Ecology and Evolution Today (SWEEET) has provided a forum in which these issues have been discussed since 2008. SWEEET will continue to be an essential part of our Annual General Meetings. Yet, CSEE does not have formal policies around gender diversity and equity. It is time to have a broader conversation around this topic. To this end, I will encourage a representative group to consider best practices in other scientific societies and to suggest the key ingredients for a CSEE position. We hope to be able to discuss this issue at the December meeting of council, but it is up to members to engage. If interested to be part of such a group, which might meet virtually over the coming months, please contact the President: Jeremy Kerr, jkerr@uottawa.ca.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Honorary Lifetime Members

Honorary Lifetime Memberships in CSEE recognize eminent Canadian ecologists or evolutionary biologists who have demonstrated a lifetime of research and contributions to ecology or evolution.

Pielou_lifetimeChris (Evelyn Chrystalla) Pielou is recognized for her excellence and distinguished service in the fields of mathematical ecology and ecological diversity. She wrote six books in the area of Mathematical Ecology and Ecological Diversity between 1969 and 1984. After her retirement, she continued to write popular books on ecosystems and environmental topics. In journal articles she developed a mathematical measure of associations among groups of species, which serves as a measure of the “structure” of multi-species communities. She was also interested in inter-relationships among ecology, biogeography, and the paleo-equivalents of ecological communities.


Holling_lifetimev2C.S. (Buzz) Holling
is best known for two scientific advances: the functional responses of predators to prey and the concept of the resilience of social-ecological systems. These ideas have become cornerstones to contemporary ecosystem management and research into sustainability and conservation. Dr. Holling has made, and continues to make, important contributions to ecology and evolution. He has profoundly influenced students, researchers through his research and teaching.

Harvey_lifetimeHarold H. Harvey was instrumental in identifying the acidification of North American aquatic ecosystems, and the impact this change had on the ecosystems. He devoted a great amount of his time to raise the consciousness of the Canadian and American public and policy makers to acidification problems. His numerous critical contributions eventually led to both countries imposing strict controls on emissions. His research and its impact on the public and policy makers ultimately minimized further degradation of hundreds of thousands of lakes and streams in North America thereby allowing their chemical and ecological recovery.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

2016 CSEE Election Results

We are very pleased to announce the results for this year’s election to the CSEE council. Five positions were open. First, Professor Isabelle Coté from Simon Fraser University was elected as the society’s next Vice-President, for two years starting at this summer’s AGM in St. John’s in July, followed by two years as President. Professor Yolanda Morbey from Western University was acclaimed as Treasurer. Professors Alison Derry (Université du Québec à Montréal) and Chris Eckert (Queen’s University) were elected as councillors. Dr. Julie Yee-Law, from University of British Columbia, was elected as a postdoctoral/student councillor. We look forward to working with new members of the council as CSEE continues to evolve in Canada’s rapidly changing scientific landscape.

We are equally grateful to colleagues who were not elected. Professors Jana Vamosi (University of Calgary), Graham Thompson (Western University), Marc Johnson (University of Toronto, Mississauga), Megan Frederickson (University of Toronto, St. George), Ms. Nicola Day (Wilfrid Laurier), and Mr. Tom Iwanicki (University of Victoria) also received considerable support in this election, and we appreciate their service and leadership.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Evolutionary Applications Special Issue

In January 2016, Evolutionary Applications published a special issue on the contributions of women to basic and applied evolutionary biology (Volume 9 Issue 1) which includes papers by a number of members of CSEE. The issue was edited by Maren Wellenreuther and Louis Bernatchez. In addition to scientific papers, the authors give personal insights and recommendations to the next generation of evolutionary biologists.EvoApp_Jan2016

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share