Predator-Prey Interactions Gordon Conference: Registration now open

Third Gordon Research Conference on Predator-Prey Interactions
January 28 – February 2, 2018, Ventura, California
http://www.grc.org/programs.aspx?id=16781
2018 Theme:”Scaling Across Space and Time”

Gordon Research Conferences are recognized as the “world’s premier scientific conferences”, where leading investigators from around the globe meet biennially for a full week of intense discussion of the frontier research in their field. We have an outstanding list of confirmed speakers and contributors (below). Our meeting is capped at 200 people, and filling up fast… so please register soon!

The neurobiology of responses to risk in individual prey can, when aggregated across a population, profoundly affect surrounding ecosystems. Similarly, researchers are increasingly aware of how quickly selection and epigenetic forces can shift prey phenotypes and alter future interactions with predators. In both cases, the connections between small-scale (within an individual or at a single point in time) and large-scale (across ecosystems or generations) processes illustrate how exploring the ‘linkage map’ of predator-prey interactions across scales can identify new fields of research and synergize the collaborations necessary to address them. We have targeted the most exciting advances in predator-prey work across multiple fields, with each speaker agreeing to share their latest unpublished findings. In order to encourage active participation from everyone at the conference, all attendees are strongly encouraged to present a poster on their work.

The complete program is available, along with further details concerning registration, at our website (http://www.grc.org/programs.aspx?id=16781).

Sessions and Confirmed Speakers

Predator-prey interactions in the field and lab
Joel Berger, Caroline Blanchard (speakers)
Jacqueline Blundell & Evan Preisser (discussion leaders)

Evolutionary underpinnings of predator-prey interactions
John Orrock, Catherine Matassa, Robyn Crook, Robby Stoks (speakers)
Sonny Bleicher (discussion leader)

Predators at the landscape level
Elizabeth Madin, Trisha Atwood, Stephanie Periquet
Shelby Rinehart (discussion leader)

Prey responses to predator cues
Ted Stankowich, Grant Brown, William Resetarits, Mark Berry
Adam Crane (discussion leader)

Neural responses to predators
Gwyneth Card, Rupshi Mitra, Cornelius Gross
Newton Canteras (discussion leader)

Neurobiology of fear
Ken Lukowiak, Arun Asok, Gal Richter-Levin, Marta Moita
Wen Han Tong (discussion leader)

Carnivores in natural and managed landscapes
Doug Smith, Justin Suraci, Mathew Crowther
Rebecca Selden (discussion leader)

Transgenerational impacts of stress
Tracy Langkilde, Michael Sheriff, Brian Dias, Regina Sullivan
Michael Clinchy (discussion leader)

Past, present, and future directions in fear and predator-prey research
James Estes, Liana Zanette
Maud Ferrari & Ajai Vyas (discussion leaders)-

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Invitation to Participate in External Review of IPBES Assessments

IPBES aims to finalize five assessments at the sixth session of the IPBES Plenary, in March 2018: four regional assessments of biodiversity and ecosystem services (for Africa, the Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe and Central Asia) and the thematic assessment on land degradation and restoration.

One of the most important phases in drafting assessments is the period in which they are opened for external review by any interested experts, ranging from scientists and decision-makers, to practitioners and the holders of indigenous and local knowledge.

Participation and engagement of Governments in the external review period is especially vital to strengthen the credibility, legitimacy and policy relevance of the assessments, as well as to deepen their ownership of the assessments.

The eight-week period for external review of the second order drafts of the assessment chapters and the first order drafts of the summaries for policymakers will run from 1 May until 26 June 2017 for the land degradation and restoration, Africa, Asia-Pacific and Europe and Central Asia assessments; and from 29 May until 24 July 2017 for the Americas assessment.

Experts wishing to participate will first need to register as users of the IPBES website (http://www.ipbes.net/user/register?destination=sod-review) if they have not already done so. They can then apply to become an IPBES external reviewer for individual chapters per assessment at www.ipbes.net/sod-review (this will only work when logged in first as IPBES website users). They will receive confidential access to the draft chapters and summaries for policymakers and will be requested to submit their comments in English using a template that will also be supplied. All relevant comments will then be addressed by the assessment authors in the next round of revisions.

We have recorded a 20-minute webinar focusing on how Governments especially can participate in this external review. The webinar can be accessed on the IPBES website and at: https://youtu.be/tnx8nxDId08 The secretariat is also producing ‘print-ready’ A-5 size flyers in all six UN official languages, which will soon be shared with you electronically to help your efforts to advertise the external review process.  

Thank you in advance for your support in helping us to ensure the widest possible range of expert participation in the external review process – the more relevant comments we receive, the better the assessments will all be.

Yours sincerely,

Anne Larigauderie | Executive Secretary

Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services

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External review period for IPBES assessments

The IPBES (Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services) secretariat has announced a period for external review of:

  • Drafts of the thematic assessment report on land degradation and restoration
  • Drafts of the four regional assessments (Africa, Asia-Pacific, Americas, and Europe and Central Asia) on biodiversity and ecosystem services,
  • First order drafts of their Summaries for Policymakers.
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2017 Early Career Awards

The CSEE Early Career Awards recognize outstanding accomplishments and promising future research potential in ecology and evolution by scientists early in their careers. We are delighted to announce that the recipients for the 2017 awards are Dr. Emily Darling, from the University of Toronto and the Wildlife Conservation Society, and Dr. Sean Anderson, from the University of Washington. We look forward to hearing their plenary talks at the CSEE meeting in Victoria.

Congratulations to both recipients, and hats off to all candidates for the very high calibre of their submissions.

Dr Emily Darlingedarling

Emily is a community ecologist and conservation biologist who is motivated to understand how human activities are altering coastal and marine ecosystems. Her research focuses on three interrelated themes: quantifying interactions between multiple stressors and the prevalence of ecological synergies, coral life histories and trajectories of community change on coral reefs, and managing marine ecosystems for resilience to climate change. Her work integrates multiple approaches, ranging from literature reviews, meta-analyses, and statistical analyses of long-term monitoring data, to quantitative field experiments and socio-economic surveys to understand the complex ecological dynamics of coastal systems.

 

sandersonDr Sean Anderson

Sean is a quantitative population biologist who links theory with data through statistical and simulation models to improve predictions about ecological systems and inform management and policy decisions. In particular, he is interested in how we can estimate population status with limited data and in the role of variance, risk, and extreme events in population dynamics. Because these problems are complex, a large part of his research involves method and software development and is often highly collaborative. His work spans across taxa (e.g. birds, moths, grizzly bears, sea cucumbers, salmon), ecosystems (marine, freshwater, terrestrial), methods (empirical, simulation, theoretical), spatial scale (regional, national, global), and time periods (modern, historical, paleontological).

 

 

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IPBES Report on Pollinators, Pollination and Food Production

CSEE is proud to have supported engagement with IPBES, the Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, assisting Dr. Peter Kevan as a lead author on the IPBES’ recent report: Assessment on Pollinators, Pollination and Food Production. This report makes critical use of science to which CSEE researchers have contributed, bringing our research contributions into the global policy arena. The full report and the Summary for Policy Makers can be found here.

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CSEE response to US executive order on immigration

Friday, February 3, 2017

CSEE response to US executive order on immigration

[[PDF]]

The Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution (CSEE) expresses its deep concern over the recent Presidential Executive Order that prevents citizens from seven predominantly Muslim nations from travelling through or to the United States.

Scientific progress depends on the open exchange of ideas and transfer of knowledge through international research collaboration, field work, conferences, and workshops. The ban imperils these activities for many researchers, including those working in or working with colleagues in Canada, whether they are students, professors, or practicing scientists in industry, government, and non-governmental sectors.

CSEE embraces principles of diversity and tolerance that are vital to the success of Canadian science and society, but intolerance can create real threats. Recent events reconfirm the truth of Nobel Laureate Lester B. Pearson’s words, “Misunderstanding… arising from ignorance breeds fear, and fear remains the greatest enemy of peace.”

We support calls from organizations, like the Royal Society of Canada and Ecological Society of America, that this travel ban should be ended. CSEE suggests that our members work with their home institutions and in their communities to accommodate those who have been, or will be, displaced by this order.

Sincerely,

Jeremy Kerr, President

Isabelle Côté, Vice President

Miriam Richards, Secretary

Yolanda Morbey, Treasurer

Melanie Jean, Graduate Councillor

Alison Derry, Councillor

Julie Lee-Yaw, PDF Councillor

Chris Eckert, Councillor

Jill Johnstone, Councillor

Andrew Simons, Councillor

Mark Vellend, Councillor

Jeannette Whitton, Councillor

Jeffrey Hutchings, Past President

Judy Myers, Past President

Spencer Barrett, Past President

Doug Morris, Past President

 

About CSEE: The Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution (CSEE) is a non-partisan group of practicing ecologists and evolutionary biologists at all career stages throughout Canada.

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NSERC Discovery Frontiers call for proposals in Biodiversity

The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) is launching its next call for proposals under its Discovery Frontiers program. This round of funding will focus on Biodiversity and Adaptation of Biosystems.  Funding available is $1 million per year for four years. Letters of Intent are due on April 17, 2017.

To learn more about this call, visit the NSERC program website.

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CSEE members lead engagement with Species At Risk Act regulation updates

CSEE Biodiversity and Conservation Committee

Environment and Climate Change Canada posted a suite of draft policies related to the implementation of the Species at Risk Act (SARA).  The public consultation period on these policies is open until March 31st 2017. A working group comprising  CSEE members Jeannette Whitton, Jeremy Kerr, Scott Findlay, Sarah Otto, Jeff Hutchings, and Arne Mooers authored and submitted a policy critique which is available as a pdf here.

While noting that Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has recognized some of the problems and has taken initiatives to address them through the proposed policy suite, their analysis identified a number of limitations in the proposed policy suite that they judge will continue to reduce the efficacy of SARA.

To follow up, contact Jeannette Whitton, chair of the CSEE Biodiversity and Conservation Committee.

 

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