Postdoctoral Position in Fish Nutrition and Physiology. Closing Application Date: 8/12/2017.

DUTIES

One post-doctoral position is available to explore the effectiveness of using the tissues of a harvested invasive aquatic crustacean as a novel ingredient in feed for rearing freshwater salmonids in a hatchery setting. The post-doctoral fellow will play a leadership role in a project aiming to identify a locally-sourced substitute for fish meal for fish hatcheries, thus reducing pressure on declining marine fish species that are harvested for use as fish food, while also reducing the density of an invasive species from a natural habitat. Research will be carried out in collaboration with two industrial partners: Piscine Energetics Inc., in Kelowna BC, and the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC, working with their Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery in Abbottsford BC. The selected candidate will be spending at least 40% of their time on-site at the locations of these industrial partners. The project will examine the effectiveness of alternative feed formulations on the survival and growth of freshwater salmonids from the fry stage through to the adult stage. The primary duties of the postdoctoral fellow will include: (1) regular consultation with, and reporting to, team partners, (2) planning and carrying out fish nutrition and growth experiments, (3) analyzing the biochemical composition of fish food ingredients and of fish tissues, in particular the analysis of lipid profiles, total protein and digestible amino acids, and vitamins, and (4) analysis of data and publication of peer-reviewed articles.

QUALIFICATIONS

Ph.D. in fish nutrition or a related field. Experience in fish rearing and experimentation. Expertise in some or all of the following analytical techniques: lipid profile analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS); total protein analysis using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy; profiles of digestible amino acids using gas chromatography; thiamin analysis by gas chromatography; carotenoid analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) capillary electrophoresis. The following will also be considered assets: demonstrated ability to produce publications and conduct independent research; ability to take a leadership role within a small research team; student mentorship experience; strong interpersonal and communication skills.

TERMS OF POSITION

Anticipated Start Date: 1 January 2018

This position is conditional on approved funding. If approved, the position will be jointly funded through NSERC Engage and Mitacs Accelerate grants, with a salary of $45,000 per year plus full university benefits: Medical Services Plan, Extended Medical Services Plan, Dental Plan Insurance, Grouplife Insurance, Accident Death and Dismemberment Insurance, Short Term and Long Term Disability Benefits, and Pension Plan Enrolment. This is a one-year position that may be renewed for a second year according to the availability of funds and performance of the candidate.

To learn more about living in Kamloops and about Thompson Rivers University please visit our Web Site, “Living in Kamloops”: https://www.tru.ca/hr/careers/living-kamloops.html

Additional questions can be sent to Dr. Louis Gosselin (lgosselin@tru.ca) 

TO APPLY

Closing Application Date:      8/12/2017

Applications will be reviewed commencing the closing application date and may continue until the position is filled.

Apply online through the TRU website: https://tru.hua.hrsmart.com/hr/ats/Posting/view/10227

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Post-doctoral Wetland Scientist position

Project title: Wetland bioindicator development in Alberta’s wetlands in the oil sands region for long-term wetland monitoring.

Stipend: $65,000 CND/yr guaranteed for 2 years

Start date: 5 January 2018 or as soon as a suitable candidate is found

This project represents a unique opportunity for a post-doctoral student to analyse a large existing dataset to help develop a long-term wetland monitoring program. The successful applicant will delve into the Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute’s (ABMI) biodiversity dataset on plants that spans the entire boreal region of Alberta (~700 sites) to identify candidate wetland sites that span a gradient in human activity (mining, logging, oil and gas development).  This will include bogs, fens, swamps and open water wetlands.  The PDF will use this database to identify potential vegetation indicators of oil sands development impacts on regional wetlands and propose monitoring tool(s) for application in a long term monitoring program.  The PDF will test an existing Driver – Pressure – Stressor – Impact – Response (DPSIR) model of how wetland plant communities respond to oil sands mine activities.

The PDF will then validate the tool(s) and DPSIR model through field work carried out at a combination of synoptic and intensive sites, where collaborators are directly measuring the influence of oil sands mine activity on probably pathways of biological impact: e.g., mine dewatering, reduced hydrologic connectivity, aerial deposition of N and other contaminants. This will support a mechanistic understanding of how biological indicators from the plant (bryophyte and vascular) communities respond to oil sands mining.

The successful applicant will be based at the University of Waterloo, in the lab of Dr. Rebecca Rooney and will be co-supervised by Alberta Environment and Parks scientist Dr. Danielle Cobbaert, who is leading wetland monitoring program development in Alberta.  S/he will collaborate extensively with ecohydrologists (e.g., Drs Rich Petrone & Jon Price) and peatland ecologists (e.g., Drs Kelman Weider & Dale Vitt) and remote sensing scientists (Drs. Laura Chasmer and Chris Hopkinson, U. Lethbridge) who are studying the hydrologic and aerial deposition mechanisms driving biological change in response to oil sands exploitation.

To be eligible, the applicant must have received a PhD degree prior to commencing the fellowship.  S/he must have a background in wetland ecology, with experience in botany and field ecology.  Experience working with large ecological datasets in R is an asset. The PDF will be expected to prepare manuscripts and reports, thus English proficiency is required.  Must also be willing and able to carry out field work in remote locations in northern Alberta during the summers of 2018 and 2019.

Application packages should include a cover letter, C.V., unofficial transcripts, and the contact information of three references, and two recent publications. All documentation submittedmust be assembled in a single PDF file and sent to: Dr. Rebecca Rooney at rrooney@uwaterloo.ca with PDF-RWM-YourName in the subject line.

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Postdoctoral Position in Marine Genomics Dalhousie University

Support is available for a postdoctoral position at Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada) for research on the genomics of commercially exploited marine fishes. The successful candidate will have a background in bioinformatics and genomics, including genome assembly, and will be co-supervised by Paul Bentzen (paul.bentzen@dal.ca) and Daniel Ruzzante (daniel.ruzzante@dal.ca; http://ruzzante.ca ). The project will involve collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans, Canada (DFO).

The position is available for 2 years, starting as soon as a suitable candidate is found. The successful candidate will hired for one year, renewable for the second year pending satisfactory performance. Applicants please send a statement of research interests, CV, copies of up to 4 publications and the names and e-mail addresses of two people willing to act as academic references to: Daniel Ruzzante (daniel.ruzzante@dal.ca) and Paul Bentzen (paul.bentzen@dal.ca). Review of applications will start December 1.

Informal inquiries are welcome.

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Post-Doctoral Position in Plant Defence Evolution – University of Toronto at Mississauga (with Prof. Marc Johnson)

Prof. Marc Johnson’s EvoEco Lab (www.evoeco.org) is seeking applications for a Post-Doctoral Researcher to study Plant Defence Evolution against herbivores and pathogens at the University of Toronto – Mississauga (UTM). The successful candidate will examine the mechanisms and evolutionary processes affecting adaptive and non-adaptive evolution of plant chemical and non-chemical defences. The specific topic of research will depend on the successful candidate’s interests, but could for example include the population genomics of defence, macroevolution evolution of defence, the effects of sexual reproduction on defence, and more. The Johnson lab uses many natural and agricultural systems to study plant defence evolution (Arabidopsis, Oenothera, Trifolium, Glycine, Brassica, etc.), and there is opportunity to use these systems or to develop a new system, depending on the candidate’s interests and expertise. The post-doctoral researcher will have the opportunity to integrate experiments, population genomics, evolutionary genetics, plant chemistry, and modeling approaches. This project is ideally suited to individuals seeking to perform productive cutting-edge research while building collaborations across traditional disciplines. We are interested in all outstanding post-doctoral applicants with an interest and expertise in plant evolutionary biology or the evolution of plant-animal interactions; previous work in plant defence evolution specifically is an asset but not a requirement.

To learn more about the Johnson Lab’s research on plant defence evolution please visit www.evoeco.org or see:

Anstett et al. 2016. Can genetically based clines in plant defence explain greater herbivory at higher latitudes? Ecology Letters 18:1376-1386.

Thompson, K. A., and M. T. J. Johnson. 2016. Antiherbivore defenses and natural selection on floral traits. Evolution 70:796-810.

Hollister et al. 2015. Recurrent loss of sex is associated with accumulation of deleterious mutations in Oenothera. Mol Biol Evol 32:896-905.

Johnson et al. 2015. Coevolution Between Plant Reproduction and Defense Against Herbivores. AREES 46:191-213.

Johnson et al. 2014. Macroevolution of plant defenses against herbivores in the evening primroses. New Phytologist 203:267-279.

Agrawal et al. 2012. Insect herbivores drive real-time ecological and evolutionary change in plant populations. Science 338:113-116.

Johnson et al. 2009. Plant sex and the evolution of plant defenses against herbivores. PNAS 106:18079–18084.

In addition to being a part of the EvoEco Lab (www.evoeco.org), the post-doctoral researcher will be a member of the Department of Biology (http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/biology) and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca).

The UTM campus has excellent facilities for plant-insect research (wet and dry lab infrastructure, growth chambers, greenhouses), housing, and 225 acres of fields, forests, many trails and a wild salmon/trout river for recreation. Toronto and Mississauga are world-class cities that are interconnected and culturally diverse. They boast an abundance of restaurants, excellent transit systems, a diversity of cultural activities (theatres, sports, bars, clubs), and an abundance of parks and water.

Starting salary: Commensurate with experience + benefits

Start date: Flexible, but preferably before Sept. 1, 2018

Duration: 1- 3 years (conditional on favourable annual performance review)

Application Deadline: Review of applications will commence Dec. 6. Please send applications to marc.johnson@utoronto.ca

Applications should include: i) a cover letter, ii) CV, iii) PDFs of top three publications, and iv) contact information for three references.

This job is posted in accordance with the CUPE 3902 Unit 5 Collective Agreement. The normal hours of work are 40 hours per week for a full-time postdoctoral fellow recognizing that the needs of the employee’s research and training and the needs of the supervisor’s research program may require flexibility in the performance of the employee’s duties and hours of work. The position will regularly require evening and/or weekend work.

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from racialized persons / persons of colour, women, Indigenous / Aboriginal People of North America, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ persons, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.

Contact information:

Marc T. J. Johnson, Ph.D.
Director, Centre for Urban Environments (CUE)
Associate Professor
Depts. of Biology & EEB
University of Toronto – Mississauga
marc.johnson@utoronto.ca

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Post-Doctoral Researcher position, University of Toronto – Mississauga

Prof. Marc Johnson’s EvoEco Lab (www.evoeco.org) is seeking applications for a Post-Doctoral Researcher to study Urban Evolutionary Ecology at the University of Toronto – Mississauga (UTM). The successful candidate will examine how urbanization influences adaptive and non-adaptive evolution in plants or plant-animal interactions. We presently use several systems to study urban evolution (Trifolium repensImpatiens capensisBrassica rapa) and there is opportunity to use these systems or to develop a new system, depending on the candidate’s interests and expertise. The post-doctoral researcher will have the opportunity to integrate experiments, genomic and modeling approaches. This project is ideally suited to individuals seeking to perform productive cutting-edge research while connecting with a global network of collaborators and the public. We are interested in all outstanding post-doctoral applicants with an interest and expertise in plant evolutionary biology or plant-animal interactions; previous work in urban systems is not a requirement.

To learn more about the Johnson Lab’s research on urban evolutionary ecology please see:

Johnson, M. T. J., and J. Munshi-South. 2017. The evolution of life in urban environments. Science 358: DOI: 10.1126/science.aam1832.

Thompson, K. A., M. Renaudin, and M. T. J. Johnson. 2016. Urbanization drives the evolution of parallel clines in plant populations. Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. B 283:20162180.

Johnson, M. T. J., K. A. Thompson, and H. S. Saini. 2015. Plant evolution in the urban jungle. Am. J. Bot. 102:1951-1953.

In addition to being a part of the EvoEco Lab, the post-doctoral researcher will be a member of the new Centre for Urban Environments (www.urbanenvironment.ca),  the Department of Biology (http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/biology), and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca).

The UTM campus has excellent facilities for research (wet and dry lab infrastructure, growth chambers, greenhouses), housing, and 225 acres of fields, forests, many trails and a wild salmon/trout river for recreation. Toronto and Mississauga are world-class cities that are interconnected and culturally diverse. They boast an abundance of restaurants, excellent transit systems, a diversity of cultural activities (theatres, sports, bars, clubs), and an abundance of parks and water.

Starting salary: Commensurate with experience + benefits

Start date: Flexible, but preferably before Sept. 1, 2018

Duration: 1- 3 years (conditional on favourable annual performance review)

Application Deadline: Review of applications will commence Dec. 6. Please send applications to marc.johnson@utoronto.ca

Applications should include: i) a cover letter, ii) CV, iii) PDFs of top three publications, and iv) contact information for three references.

This job is posted in accordance with the CUPE 3902 Unit 5 Collective Agreement. The normal hours of work are 40 hours per week for a full-time postdoctoral fellow recognizing that the needs of the employee’s research and training and the needs of the supervisor’s research program may require flexibility in the performance of the employee’s duties and hours of work. The position will will regularly require evening and/or weekend work.

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from racialized persons / persons of colour, women, Indigenous / Aboriginal People of North America, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ persons, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.

Marc T. J. Johnson, Ph.D.
Director, Centre for Urban Environments (CUE)
Associate Professor
Depts. of Biology & EEB
University of Toronto – Mississauga
marc.johnson@utoronto.ca

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PhD/PDF Student Opportunity , Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta

Parental Selection and Assessing the Potential Impacts of Elite Breeding in White Spruce

We are seeking a PhD or PDF student to test the hypothesis that gene expression of gibberellic acid in white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings can be used as an indicator of trees with superior growth characteristics. Faster growing parents will be selected based on growth data and physiological markers for gibberellic acid and gene expression based on greenhouse trials. With identification of elite parents, an advanced breeding strategy will be designed and implemented using tools such as a differential evolution algorithm developed from animal breeding.

Qualifications: Preference will be given to prospective students that have:

  • An MSc/PhD degree in forest genetics or related field, and familiarity with ecophysiology.
  • An advanced understanding of tree breeding strategies.
  • Experience in field work and tree breeding.
  • A valid class 5 driver’s licence (or equivalent), and be eligible to drive UofA vehicles.
  • Proficiency in spoken and written English.
  • Knowledge of experimental design and associated statistical programs (eg: R, SAS).

Funding: This project is fully funded (~$24,000/year, ~$45,000/year for PDFs) through an NSERC Industrial Research Chair program for 3.5 years (PhD) with additional scholarship funds available for Canadian students with a GPA of 3.7 or greater. We encourage students to pursue additional funding through internal/external sources.

Start date: Flexible start date in 2018.

Application: Prospective students must apply through UofA Graduate Studies; however, those interested should first email Dr. Barb Thomas (bthomas@ualberta.ca and cc Morgan Randall mrandall@ualberta.ca) the following:

  • a letter of interest (1 page)
  • a CV describing qualifications and experience
  • unofficial transcripts
  • contact information for three references

Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Informal inquiries to gain more information about the positions are also welcome.

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PhD/PDF Student Opportunity, Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta

Understanding Patterns and Mechanisms Driving Clone Size and Gender Performance in Trembling Aspen in Alberta

We are seeking a PhD or PDF student who is interested in genetics, ecology, ecophysiology and their interaction on the landscape. The goal of this project is to describe the patterns of aspen (Populus tremuloides) clone size and gender distribution in active aspen forest management regions in Alberta, while also using genetic markers to understand recent declines in aspen health due to drought.

Qualifications: Preference will be given to prospective students that have:

  • An MSc/PhD degree in forestry, ecology, genetics or related field.
  • A strong background in quantitative genetics, and/or plant ecophysiology.
  • A GPA >3.5 and evidence of success.
  • Familiarity with an IRGA or other ecophysiology equipment.
  • Experience in field work.
  • A valid class 5 driver’s licence (or equivalent), and be eligible to drive UofA vehicles.
  • Proficiency in spoken and written English.
  • Knowledge of experimental design and associated statistical programs (eg: R, SAS).

Funding: This project is fully funded (~$24,000 /year for PhDs, ~$45,000/year for PDFs) through an NSERC Industrial Research Chair program for 2 or 3 years, with additional scholarship funds available for Canadian students with a GPA of 3.7 or greater. We encourage students to pursue additional funding through internal/external sources.

Start date: Immediate/Flexible start date in 2018.

Application: Prospective students must apply through UofA Graduate Studies; however, those interested should first email Dr. Barb Thomas (bthomas@ualberta.ca and cc Morgan Randall mrandall@ualberta.ca) the following information:

  • a letter of interest (1 page)
  • a CV describing qualifications and experience
  • unofficial transcripts
  • contact information for three references

Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Informal inquiries to gain more information about the positions are also welcome.

 

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Postdoctoral Associate in Marine Microbial Ecology

We are seeking two or three post-docs to join an interdisciplinary lab working at the intersection of plankton ecology and the consequences of climate change. We have several active projects including work on marine microbial biogeography and bioinformatic analysis of eukaryotic (protist) transcriptomes. The position is located at Mount Allison University (Sackville, NB, Canada) and Dalhousie University (Halifax, NS, Canada). We have strong collaborative relationships with colleagues at MIT and other US universities. Funding is provided by the Simons Foundation and NSERC Canada.

We are seeking independent, creative researchers with a keen interest in developing new computational skills. Your primary focus will likely be in one of statistical modelling, time-series analysis, or bioinformatics.

You should have a PhD with research experience in one or more of statistics, oceanography, or marine ecology. Strong computing skills with experience with R and Bayesian statistical modeling tools would be an asset. Your application should include a c.v., contact information for three referees, and a brief description of your research experience, interests and goals. Send your inquiries or application as a pdf to Andrew Irwin, airwin@mta.ca. Applications will be reviewed as they are received.

For more information about the lab go to mmab.ca.

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Postdoc position in macro ecology and conservation at the University of Northern British Columbia

The Integrated Forest Decisions Lab seeks a postdoctoral fellow for a NASA funded project mapping change in global forest integrity over time, and linking this change to biodiversity trends.

The project team involves investigators from University of Northern British Columbia (Oscar Venter), NASA (Cindy Schmidt), the United Nations Development Program (Jamison Ervin), Wildlife Conservation Society (James Watson), Montana State University (Andrew Hansen), University of Maryland (Matthew Hansen) and Arizona State University (Scott Goetz and Patrick Jantz). The results of this project will inform the National Biodiversity Strategic Action Plans in 6 partner countries (Columbia, Indonesia, Brazil, DRC, Vietnam, Ecuador).

The postdoc will join the IFD lab for two years, contributing to the project by updating the global human footprint map (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/08/human-footprint-map-ecological-impact/) with the latest datasets, as well as investigate empirical links between biodiversity trends and measures of the Human Footprint and forest integrity. Opportunities will be available for independent projects on related topics, as well as supervising graduate students with overlapping interests.

Ideal candidates will have a passion for biodiversity conservation and a desire to contribute to real world conservation outcomes, as well as enjoy working as part of a team in a collaborative setting. In addition to a background in the ecological sciences, the successful candidate will have some combination of skills in: programming, statistics and R, working with big data, high level GIS.

Position details: Salary is $55K CND/year, term is 2 years, based in Prince George BC, Canada.

To apply, email a cover letter, CV, and contact details for three references in a single pdf file to Dr. Oscar Venter at oscar.venter@ unbc. ca. For questions, contact Dr Venter.

Review of applications will begin 30 September 2017, and will continue until the position is filled.

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Postdoctoral Fellow position (Canada)

A postdoctoral fellow position is available with Dr. Craig Purchase at Memorial University, in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada.

Lab research focuses on evolutionary ecology, particularly life history variation, phenotypic plasticity, local adaptation, and sperm & egg quality/performance. Most of our current work is on gamete ecology. We do not focus on aquaculture oriented questions, but do work on a variety of marine and freshwater fishes.

For more information on my research program visit www.ucs.mun.ca/~cfpurchase

The PDF will likely (1) be given data from completed experiments to write up quickly, (2) conduct new experiments, and (3) function as a group leader. Most of the research will be on wild salmonids.

I am most interested in people that have backgrounds in fish reproduction, or salmon biology, or sperm biology (any taxa). Candidates should have a PhD and a proven publication record.

Interested individuals should send a cover letter, CV, and unofficial copy of transcripts to cfpurchase@mun.ca.

Review of applications will begin immediately (posted July 7/17) and continue until the position is filled. If a suitable candidate can be found, I desire to have them start asap, but necessarily before November 2017. Salary is TBD, and the position will likely be supported for 12 months.

Cheers

Craig

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