INTERESTED IN GRADUATE RESEARCH ON PTARMIGAN HABITAT ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT IN LABRADOR?

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP (M.Sc.) at Memorial University (St. John’s and Corner Brook, NL, Canada) beginning September 2020 — A M.Sc. graduate assistantship is available to conduct research assessing spatial ecology and habitat use of ptarmigan species in Labrador. Specific goals include developing a clear understanding of ptarmigan winter and summer range, mapping potential habitat for ptarmigan, and predicting potential impacts of climate change on ptarmigan populations and migration. The project will be conducted in collaboration with staff from Nunatsiavut Government, members of local communities of Labrador, and staff from both the Newfoundland and Labrador Wildlife Division and Parks Canada.

The position will be co-supervised by Dr. Ian Warkentin (Memorial University) and Dr. Darroch Whitaker (Parks Canada). There will be an opportunity to participate in field work being carried out by the Newfoundland and Labrador Wildlife Division, but primary responsibility of the student will be analyses of tracking data.  Strong applicants will have (1) developed statistical skills (experience working with large datasets would be an asset) and (2) experience working with geospatial data and applications such as ARC GIS.  The candidate must meet Cognitive and Behavioural Ecology Program requirements (www.mun.ca/become/graduate/programs/cognitive.php) with a B.Sc. in biology, ecology or relevant field and be eligible for fellowship support (minimum 75% average); stipend of $20,500 plus research funding, with the opportunity to earn more through teaching assistant positions.  Please send (as electronic attachments) a letter of interest, CV and un-official transcripts, and also arrange for three professional/academic references to be sent to DR. IAN WARKENTIN (Email ian.warkentin-at-grenfell.mun.ca). Application review begins 1 February 2020 and continues until the position is filled.

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Regulatory Specialist, Tłı̨chǫ Government

Tłı̨chǫ Government invites all suitable qualified candidatesto apply for the Regulatory Specialist re-advertised position.

Tłı̨chǫ Government is committed to attracting and recruiting the best possible candidates for available positions. The principles of fairness, qualifications and Tłı̨chǫ citizenship guide the hiring of Tłı̨chǫ Government employees.

POSITION TITLE:               Regulatory Specialist
DEPARTMENT:                  Culture and Lands Protection
LOCATION:         Yellowknife, NT
STATUS:               Full Time, Permanent
CLOSING DATE:                January 17, 2020; 5:00 pm

OUTLINE OF POSITION:

Reporting to the Manager, Lands Regulation, the Regulatory Specialist is accountable for conducting technical assessments; making recommendations on land and water use submissions; reviews for mining and other land use developments on Tłı̨chǫ lands and within Mǫwhì Gogha Dè Nı̨ı̨tłèè; providing technical advice relating to industrial, mining and other developments; and monitoring and evaluating compliance of land use permits, water license and access agreement conditions. The Regulatory Specialist has significant latitude in conducting technical reviews and making recommendations concerning land, water and resource submissions and reviews.

SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED:

  • Post-secondary degree in civil, environmental or mine engineering, environmental science, management or equivalent
  • Familiarity with conducting technical reviews of environmental applications, submissions and reviews, particularly for mining and industrial developments
  • Familiarity with land and resource management systems and approaches, and the legislative and regulatory regime (Tłı̨chǫ laws, MVRMA) applying to Wek’èezhı̀i and Mǫwhì Gogha Dè Nı̨ı̨tłèè especially the land use permitting and water licensing processes
  • Familiarity with mapping systems and the concepts and techniques of land and resource management in northern Canada
  • Highly developed analytic and practical reasoning abilities
  • Sensitivity to and willingness to be guided by Tłı̨chǫ geographical and land and resource use concepts and traditions
  • Good mathematical and problem-solving abilities
  • Very good interpersonal and communication skills and ability to work as a team member
  • Very good computer skills and the ability to use electronic data bases and filing systems
  • Ability to work with Tłı̨chǫ community members, particularly elders and harvesters
  • Ability to speak the Tłı̨chǫ language is an asset

For a copy of the Job Description, email hr@tlicho.com

 To apply, submit your resume and cover letter to hr@tlicho.com

Human Resources, Department of Corporate Services, Tłı̨chǫ Ndek’àowo / Tłı̨chǫ Government
P.O. Box 412, Behchokǫ̀, NT, X0E 0Y0
Tel: 867.392.6381 • Fax 867.392.6862
www.tlicho.ca

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Assistant Professor in Watershed Ecology, School of Environmental Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia. Application deadline: February 7, 2020.

The School of Environmental Sciences at Simon Fraser University, in Burnaby, British Columbia, invites applications for an Assistant Professor in Watershed Ecology.

The ideal candidate is a biological scientist interested in landscape-scale research questions, with an ability to work collaboratively with physical scientists. We are open to applications from individuals in a broad range of fields related to ecological dynamics at watershed scales. Potential expertise could include river and riparian zone ecology, eco-hydrology, landscape ecology, watershed management, and restoration science. The successful applicant will contribute to a dynamic and creative research and teaching community at SFU, joining a group of physical and biological water scientists, spread across Biological Sciences, Earth Sciences, Environmental Science, Geography, and Resource and Environmental Management.

The successful candidate should have demonstrated research excellence through the development of a vigorous, high-profile, and externally-funded research program. The candidate will help build an integrated water sciences group within the new School of Environmental Science. Associate member status with other units on campus will facilitate diverse opportunities for graduate student training. Teaching responsibilities will include delivering courses in support of the interdisciplinary Environmental Science undergraduate program and the Masters of Ecological Restoration program.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and Permanent Residents of Canada will be given priority. Simon Fraser University, located in Metro Vancouver, is an equity employer and encourages applications from all qualified individuals including women, persons with disabilities, visible minorities, Indigenous Peoples, people of all sexual orientations and gender identities, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of the university. This position is subject to availability of funding and approval by the SFU Board of Governors.

Candidates should submit a single pdf to EVSCHire@sfu.ca that includes:

  1. A one-page cover letter (include a statement of citizenship and/or residency status)
  2. A full CV that includes a list of publications, teaching experience and student supervision
  3. A two-page statement of research experience, interests and future directions
  4. A one-page statement of teaching interests
  5. Names and contact information of three references

The deadline for applications is February 7, 2020. If you have any questions, please contact Rebecca Ho, Manager, Environmental Science at EVSC_Mgr@sfu.ca.

Search Committee chair:

Dr. Jeremy Venditti, Director
School of Environmental Sciences
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6

Under the authority of the University Act, personal information that is required by the University for academic appointment competitions will be collected. For further details, see the Collection Notice.

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Multiple graduate positions in honey bee health genomics at York University, Toronto, Canada.

The Zayed lab (http://www.yorku.ca/zayedlab/) in the Department of Biology at York University (Toronto, Canada) is looking for enthusiastic graduate students (PhD or MSc), starting September 2020, to carry out research on a Genome Canada funded project called BeeCSI (beecsi.ca). Our team will develop biomarkers for a large number of stressors, and combinations of stressors, that affect the health of honey bees. This effort will ultimately involve analysis of approximately 3,000 honey bee transcriptomes, proteomes and gut microbiomes in collaboration with a large network of researchers from across Canada including colleagues at UBC, AAFC, University of Manitoba, University of Guelph, and Laval University.

Successful candidates will receive training in genomics, bioinformatics and sociobiology in a very collaborative environment. Additionally, candidates will benefit from interacting with many researchers at YorkU’s Bee Ecology, Evolution and Conservation consortium (BEEc, https://bees.yorku.ca). Together, BEEc includes 10 full time faculty (4 bee biologists, 1 mathematician, 1 engineer, and 4 social scientists), 39 graduate students, 11 post-doctoral fellows, and 4 research assistants and associates.

Toronto is a great city to live and work in; BEEtheNORTH! If you are interested, please send your c.v., contacts for 3 references, and a cover letter to zayed@yorku.ca

Information about applying to graduate school at York University can be found here
https://biology.gradstudies.yorku.ca/apply/

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Ph.D. project : Forecasting the spread of spruce budworm outbreaks

Context

The spruce budworm  (SBW,  Choristoneura fumiferana) is the most important defoliating insect of coniferous stands in North America. In 2017, this insect affected an area of 7 million hectares, more than 12% of Quebec’s boreal forest.

The frequency of SBW outbreaks has changed over the last century, and both their frequency and severity are expected to increase due to climate change. Thus, if we could improve our capacity to forecast which areas will be affected by an ongoing outbreak, the economic (timber loss and growth reduction) and ecological (carbon emissions) impacts of the outbreaks could be partly mitigated.

Objectives and Methodology

This project aims to develop spatiotemporal models of the spread of SBW outbreaks at the scale of Quebec, as a function of the climate and the structure of the forest landscape. Those models will synthesize various sources of data already available (aerial surveys, remote sensing, dendrochronological series). Several advanced approaches to ecological modeling (hierarchical models, machine learning) will be used and the resulting models will be evaluated on their ability to predict the dynamics of an outbreak after being trained on data from the previous outbreak. Access to Compute Canada supercomputers will allow the application of complex models to large datasets.

Keywords: sustainable forest management, climate change, forest ecology, spatial modelling, natural disturbances.

Location: The student will be based at the Forest Research Institute (IRF; https://www.uqat.ca/programmes/irf/) at the Rouyn-Noranda or Amos campus of the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, and will be co-supervised by Philippe Marchand (https://bit.ly/2DFyGl6) and Miguel Montoro Girona (https://bit.ly/34LfttX). The IRF is dynamic, multicultural and international and provides a quality environment for students to develop their research, with 12 professors and more than 60 graduate students working on very diverse topics such as forest dynamics, silviculture, genetics, biodiversity, ecophysiology and sustainable forest management. IRF students also benefit from professional development resources and opportunities (scholarships, participation in conferences, workshops) offered by the Centre for Forest Research (www.cef-cfr.ca). In addition, the student will be a member of the Chair in Sustainable Forest Management (http://chaireafd.uqat.ca/). As part of this project, the student will also have the option of completing an international internship funded with our collaborators in the United States (Harvard University) or the Netherlands (Wageningen University).

Funding: $21,000 annual scholarship for 3 years.

Preferred qualifications: Master’s in ecology or forestry with an interest in statistics and modelling, OR Master’s in mathematics, statistics, geomatics or informatics, with an interest in their environmental applications in a context of climate change.

Preferred start date: Summer or Fall 2020

Project collaborators: Yves Bergeron (UQAT), Mathieu Bouchard (MFFP), Louis De Grandpré (SCF), Matthew Duveneck (Harvard), Élise Filotas (TÉLUQ), Anouschka Hof (Wageningen), Hubert Morin (UQAC), Pierre Therrien (MFFP).

Are you ready to begin your Ph.D. on this fascinating topic? Send your CV, a cover letter, a transcript and contact information for two references to Philippe Marchand (philippe.marchand@uqat.ca) and Miguel Montoro Girona (miguel.montoro@uqat.ca). Review of applications will start on January 20, 2020 and continue until the position is filled. A professional adventure in the great boreal forest of Abitibi awaits you!

Links :

Abitibi-Témiscamingue Tourism : https://www.abitibi-temiscamingue-tourism.org/

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M.Sc. project: Historical impact of climate on the defoliation of black spruce by the spruce budworm

Context

The spruce budworm  (SBW,  Choristoneura fumiferana) is the most important defoliating insect of coniferous stands in North America. In 2017, this insect affected an area of 7 million hectares, more than 12% of Quebec’s boreal forest.

Black spruce, one of the most abundant and economically important species in the boreal forest, is relatively resistant to SBW outbreaks. However, studies have shown that a warming climate, creating greater synchronicity between the emergence of black spruce buds and SBW larvae, would increase the susceptibility of this species to future outbreaks.

Objectives and Methodology

This project aims to determine the interaction between climate and defoliation caused by SBW on the growth of forest stands in the 20th century throughout Quebec. We will use existing dendrochronological (tree ring measurements) databases  for black spruce and the other SBW-affected species, white spruce and balsam fir, to model their growth as a function of climate in the presence or absence of an outbreak (https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2018.01905). Hierarchical models will allow dendrochronological series to be combined with other sources of information on outbreaks (e.g. aerial surveys since 1968) and produce more accurate maps of the historical progression of SBW activity. Access to Compute Canada supercomputers will allow the application of complex models to large datasets.

Keywords: sustainable forest management, climate change, forest ecology, dendrochronology, natural disturbances.

Location: The student will be based at the Forest Research Institute (IRF; https://www.uqat.ca/programmes/irf/) at the Rouyn-Noranda or Amos campus of the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, and will be co-supervised by Philippe Marchand (https://bit.ly/2DFyGl6) and Miguel Montoro Girona (https://bit.ly/34LfttX). The IRF is dynamic, multicultural and international and provides a quality environment for students to develop their research, with 12 professors and more than 60 graduate students working on very diverse topics such as forest dynamics, silviculture, genetics, biodiversity, ecophysiology and sustainable forest management. IRF students also benefit from professional development resources and opportunities (scholarships, participation in conferences, workshops) offered by the Centre for Forest Research (www.cef-cfr.ca). In addition, the student will be a member of the Chair in Sustainable Forest Management (http://chaireafd.uqat.ca/). As part of this project, the student will also have the option of completing an international internship funded with our collaborators in the United States (Harvard University) or the Netherlands (Wageningen University).

Funding: $18,000 annual scholarship for 2 years.

Preferred qualifications: Undergraduate degree in biology, ecology, environmental science or forestry with an interest in statistics, GIS and modelling, OR degree in mathematics, statistics, geomatics or informatics, with an interest in their environmental applications in a context of climate change.

Preferred start date: Summer or Fall 2020

Project collaborators: Yves Bergeron (UQAT), Mathieu Bouchard (MFFP), Louis De Grandpré (SCF), Matthew Duveneck (Harvard), Élise Filotas (TÉLUQ), Anouschka Hof (Wageningen), Hubert Morin (UQAC), Pierre Therrien (MFFP).

Are you ready to begin your Master’s on this fascinating topic? Send your CV, a cover letter, a transcript and contact information for two references to Philippe Marchand (philippe.marchand@uqat.ca) and Miguel Montoro Girona (miguel.montoro@uqat.ca). Review of applications will start on January 20, 2020 and continue until the position is filled. A professional adventure in the great boreal forest of Abitibi awaits you!

Links :

Abitibi-Témiscamingue Tourism : https://www.abitibi-temiscamingue-tourism.org/

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Postdoctoral position: Climate change, fire behavior, plant physiology

The Physiological Ecology Lab at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC, Canada (PI Sean Michaletz; www.michaletzlab.org) is recruiting a postdoctoral researcher to study fire behavior and its effects on plant physiology and forest dynamics.

The postdoc will help develop, test, and refine a next-generation modeling framework for predicting climate change effects on plant responses to multiple interacting disturbances.  This includes extending current trait-based models for fire and drought effects on whole-plant function, and implementing these into the physics-based FIRETEC coupled fire-atmosphere model and a coupled surface-subsurface hydrology model.  The modeling framework will be tested and refined using experimental data collected at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, USA.  The postdoc will be based at the University of British Columbia, but will work closely with collaborators Adam Atchley, Rod Linn, and the Applied Terrestrial, Energy and Atmospheric Modeling Team (bit.ly/2DBhPQc) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA.  The position is funded through SERDP (DOD, EPA, DOE).  We encourage applicants who can work across disciplines and combine mathematical models with data to study links between climate change, disturbances, whole-plant physiology, and forest ecosystem processes.

Funding is available for at least 3 years at a competitive salary that is commensurate with qualifications and experience.  Additional support is available for conference and fieldwork travel.  Start date is February 2020 but may be flexible.  Information on benefits is available at https://goo.gl/PDZX5p.  The lab strongly supports positive work-life balance for people in all stages of their careers.

Required skills include experience combining process-based models with field data in an Earth system, geoscience, or ecophysiology context.  Desired skills include experience with field work, knowledge of fire ecology, hydrology, and plant physiology, domain modeling and code development using programming languages such as Fortran or C++, high performance and parallel computing, and numerical simulation models (computational fluid dynamics, heat transfer, ecohydrology, forest dynamics).  Candidates must exhibit effective written and oral communication skills, have demonstrated ability to publish peer-reviewed papers, and have a Ph.D. pending or obtained within the last five years.  The multidisciplinary and collaborative nature of the project also requires willingness to work on a team.

To apply, please send a CV, a one page statement explaining why the position best matches your career goals, a recent publication, and names and contact information for three references to Sean Michaletz at sean.michaletz@ubc.ca.  The application deadline is January 1st 2020, but review will begin when applications are received and continue until the position is filled.  Please feel free to contact Sean Michaletz at any time with questions or to discuss projects.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence.  An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged.  We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

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PhD/MSc on the assembly of ecological networks along abiotic gradients (Montreal: Canada). Application deadline: February 1st, 2020.

Our lab is looking for graduate students to work on the assembly of ecological networks along environmental gradients (http://jeanphilippelessard.com/). We aim to use newly developed theoretical and analytical models using functional traits to infer ecological processes underlying the structure of interaction networks. We further aim to assess how the relative influence of such processes shaping resource-consumer networks vary along broad-scale environmental gradients. The selected students will have the freedom to develop her/his own project under this topic, and will have the opportunity to use existing empirical datasets and generate new ones. Our lab is currently working on hostparasite interactions in dragonflies along temperature gradients, plant-root microbe interactions in alpine ecosystems and plant-frugivore interactions at the global scale.

Potential applicants interested in these projects should have a good knowledge of network and trait-based ecology concepts and methods, strong analytical skills in R or other programing language, and the ability to handle large datasets. Prior experience conducting fieldwork and/or is an important asset for projects requiring new data acquisition. Prior knowledge of plants and/or insects and/or microbes is an asset.

Expected starting date is August 2020, but could be as early as May 2020. The position includes funding for stipend and research activities, but students that are competitive for external funding will have priority. Concordia University also offers entrance fellowship for students with strong academic and/or research experience record. Funded positions involve some teaching in the Department of Biology at Concordia University. Selected applicant(s) is/are expected to apply for external funding, participate in regular lab meetings, attend departmental seminars, publish results in peer-reviewed journals and present their research in national and international meetings. Demonstrated experience publishing in peer-reviewed journals is a must.

Applicants should email Dr. Jean-Philippe Lessard (jp.lessard@concordia.ca). This email should include: (i) 3-4 paragraphs describing research interests, relevant past experiences, and fit for the position (ii) an updated CV, and (iii) all unofficial transcripts pertaining to your previous or ongoing studies. Complete applications must be received by the school of graduate studies (http://www.concordia.ca/admissions/graduate.html) by February 1st, 2020. Applicants from minorities and/or Latin countries are encouraged to apply.

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PhD and MSc Position available: Development of a program for captive breeding and reintroduction of the Chorus Frog

The Chorus Frog is at risk in some areas, leading to the development of a recovery strategy for this species. As part of a university, government and public collaboration, we offer a graduate student position (PhD/MSc; uOttawa). The student will be co-supervised by Vance Trudeau (University of Ottawa; captive breeding) and Marc Mazerolle (Université Laval; reintroduction). We are looking for a dynamic and independent candidate to seize this unique research opportunity. A willingness to work with government partners and NGOs is an advantage. The projects are funded, including a scholarship and the position is available immediately.. Please send a letter of motivation (maximum 1 page in English or French), accompanied by your CV, an unofficial university transcript and the names of three potential references as soon as possible to Vance Trudeau (trudeauv@uottawa.ca).
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Graduate student positions in evolutionary ecology: wildfire and amphibian range limits

The Lee-Yaw lab at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta Canada is looking to recruit 1-2 graduate students to work on the evolutionary ecology of range limits.

Current, priority projects in the lab are focused on the long-toed salamander and include:

1) Wildfire effects on genetic diversity and population connectivity

The frequency and severity of wildfires are increasing around the world, making it imperative to understand the effects of these events on wildlife populations and species of conservation concern in particular. In collaboration with Parks Canada, the Lee-Yaw lab is investigating the effects of the 2017 Kenow Wildfire on long-toed salamanders in Waterton Lakes National Park. Long-toed salamanders occur at the edge of their range in Alberta where they are considered a species of Special Concern. The Kenow Wildfire was a severe disturbance event affecting >40% of vegetated areas in the park including many of the breeding ponds used by this species. Taking advantage of pre- and post-fire samples from across the park, we will assess changes in genetic diversity and patterns of gene flow in response to the fire. This work includes opportunities for fieldwork in the stunning setting of Waterton Lakes National Park and surrounding areas of the Rocky Mountains. The project will involve molecular lab work and modelling landscape connectivity with GIS data. This project is best-suited for an MSc student, although could be extended to a PhD.  Applicants should have a background or coursework in evolution, population biology, and/or ecology. Molecular lab experience is a strong assets, as is field experience, familiarity with R, and/or experience working with GIS datasets.

For more information on this project, visit:  https://julleeyaw.weebly.com/wildfire-project.html

2) Genomic perspectives on range limits

I am seeking a motivated PhD student to collect and analyze genomic data (ddRADseq and/or transcriptome data) for the long-toed salamander. This species is found throughout the Pacific Northwest and is comprised of several, genetically distinct subspecies. The boundaries between subspecies afford an opportunity to study parapatric range limits involving hybridization while the species’ eastern range limits in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains represent an opportunity to study limits to adaptation and range limits along elevational gradients. Tissue samples from across the species’ range are available. A number of dissertation projects involving these samples are possible, including testing genetic explanations for range limits, examining hybrid zone dynamics and cytonuclear interactions, and testing biogeographic hypotheses of historical range dynamics. Prior experience in the molecular lab is essential and priority will be given to candidates who have experience with next-generation sequencing (library preparation and SNP calling). Protocol optimization and bioinformatics will be done in collaboration with other labs and may involve opportunities to travel. There is scope to pair the genomic data with other types of data (field or lab experiments, or GIS modelling) depending on the student’s interests and progress.

Other projects within the scope of my research program may be considered depending on funding.

General inquiries should be sent to Julie Lee-Yaw (julie.leeyaw@uleth.ca). Applications should be sent by December 20. Please use the subject line “Graduate Studies” and include 1) a brief statement of research interests, 2) relevant experience, 3) a current CV, 4) unofficial copies of academic transcripts, and 5) intended start data and whether you are seeking a MSc or PhD. U of L deadlines for applying to graduate school are February 1 (for a May start date) and May 1 (for fall start). All students are encouraged to apply for external funding.

The Lee-Yaw lab is committed to diversity and inclusion and welcomes applications from students with diverse backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences.

Additional Information:

Lee-Yaw Lab: https://julleeyaw.weebly.com/

U of L Biological Sciences: https://www.uleth.ca/artsci/biological-sciences

U of L Graduate Studies: https://www.uleth.ca/future-student/graduate-studies/

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