Post-doctoral Visiting Fellowship Opportunity on Recovery Strategies for Depleted Populations of Pacific Salmon

Canadian Government Laboratory Visiting Fellow program

POST-DOCTORAL POSITION

We are seeking a Visiting Fellow to lead a research project on evaluating recovery strategies for depleted populations of Pacific salmon with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO). The Principal Investigators of the project are Dr. Carrie Holt (PBS), Kendra Holt (IOS) and Ann-Marie Huang (Annacis Island); key collaborators include representation from DFO Science and Fisheries Management: Mike Hawkshaw, Jeff Grout, Sarah Hawkshaw, and Robyn Forrest.

PROJECT OBJECTIVES

Our goal is to create a framework for developing recovery plans for Pacific salmon that evaluates trade-offs between conservation objectives and other fisheries management objectives. Within Canada, there are approximately 450 Conservation Units (CUs) of Pacific salmon, of which a large proportion have been assessed or are expected to be assessed with poor status below conservation thresholds. However, progress on implementing recovery strategies has been limited by a lack of tools to evaluate management actions. Our specific objectives are to identify management approaches (e.g., target exploitation rates, harvest control rules) to achieve recovery, and develop tools to identify CU-specific management actions. This will include exploring how to achieve targets in the context of multiple mixed-stock fisheries. The successful candidate will develop a simulation model within a Management Strategy Evaluation, MSE, context to evaluate a range of management strategies for achieving recovery and will consider environmental forcing of population dynamics that may impact productivity and confound recovery efforts. The project will work closely with fisheries management to link tool development with priorities for decision-making through a series of meetings and workshops.

ESSENTIAL ASSET QUALIFICATIONS

Applicants must have completed a PhD in fisheries science or a related discipline within the past five years. Experience using R programming language is essential. Candidates with experience in simulation modelling of population dynamics on marine fish species and evaluating impacts on fisheries and management will be given priority. Successful candidates will have a proven capacity to publish in peer-reviewed journals. Those who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada must satisfy Canadian immigration requirements.

LOCATION OF TENURE FLEXIBLE: Pacific Biological Station (PBS), Nanaimo, BC; Institute of Ocean Sciences (IOS), Sidney, BC; or Annacis Island, Delta, BC. The west coast of Canada, and Vancouver Island in particular, is well known for its rainforests, beaches, and mountains. It is a destination for kayaking, hiking, surfing, skiing, diving, biking and camping.

POSITION DETAILS AND HOW TO APPLY

This fellowship is available to start October 1, 2017 and will be completed September 31, 2019 with a salary of $62,000 CAD per annum. The Canadian Government Laboratory Visiting Fellow program is administered by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). More details about the program can be found at: http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/Students-Etudiants/PD-NP/Laboratories-Laboratoires/index_eng.asp. All candidates must meet NSERC eligibility requirements http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/NSERC-CRSNG/Eligibility-Admissibilite/students-etudiants_eng.asp

CONTACT

Interested applicants should email: 1) CV; and 2) cover letter outlining the experience and skills they bring to the project to: Carrie Holt, carrie.holt@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Short-listed applicants will be invited to develop a full application through the NSERC system. CVs will be accepted until the position is filled.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

PhD project in fire ecology in the eastern Canadian taiga

We are seeking an outstanding PhD candidate to conduct a thesis in fire ecology in the fire-prone eastern Canadian taiga. The project will be undertaken at the University of Quebec at Rimouski (UQAR; http://labdendro.uqar.ca) in collaboration with Laval University, the Canadian Forest Service and the University of Quebec in Abitibi-Témiscamingue (UQAT). The thesis will be part of a larger multidisciplinary project funded by NSERC, the Ouranos consortium, Hydro-Québec and Manitoba Hydro, that will focus on mapping the fire risk and performing a cost-benefit analysis of fire mitigation scenarios.

The selected candidate will be responsible for reconstructing the fire regime of the last 200 years along a continentality gradient corresponding to a 200 km road transect. An important challenge will consist in combining several field approaches to reconstruct fire date, fire size and fire numbers as fire activity decrease inland. A second challenge will be to quantify the interactions and feedbacks between wildfire activity and forest composition along the fire activity gradient.

The candidate will actively contribute to the production and interpretation of data and to the writing of scientific manuscripts. He/she will be mainly under the supervision of Dominique Arseneault and Martin Simard and will benefit from the diverse expertise of our team members in the fields of taiga ecology, fire ecology, dendrochronology and remote sensing. The candidate will be awarded a financial support of $21,000 (Canadian dollars) per year for a period of three years.

We are looking for a candidate with a master degree (MSc) in a relevant field (forestry, biology, geography, environmental sciences). The successful candidate will possess an excellent academic record, as well as strong analytical and problem-solving skills. He/she must be interested to perform fieldwork in difficult conditions, be resistant and efficient in the field, and should be able to work with autonomy, curiosity, discipline, motivation and determination and have excellent writing skills. Knowledge of French is an asset but is not mandatory.

The project will begin as soon as possible, preferably in September 2017. We will accept applications as long as the position is not filled. Interested candidates must submit a letter of motivation, their academic transcripts, as well as the contact information of three references to Dominique Arseneault (dominique_arseneault@uqar.ca).

PhD project in fire spread modelling and fire risk mapping in the eastern Canadian taiga

We are seeking an outstanding PhD candidate to conduct a thesis in fire risk simulation in the fire-prone eastern Canadian taiga. The project will be undertaken at the University of Quebec at Rimouski (UQAR; http://labdendro.uqar.ca) in collaboration with the Canadian Forest Service, Laval University and the University of Quebec in Abitibi-Témiscamingue (UQAT). The thesis will be part of a larger multidisciplinary project funded by NSERC, the Ouranos consortium, Hydro-Québec and Manitoba Hydro, that will focus on mapping the fire risk and performing a cost-benefit analysis of fire mitigation scenarios.

The selected candidate will be responsible for using a fire spread model (the Burn-P3 model) to map burn probabilities across a large hydroelectric complex (300 000 km2) in northern Québec. An important challenge will be to parameterize the simulations in order to generate realistic fire activity (number and size of fires), as well as to reproduce the negative feedback on burn rates due to the low fuel loads of young forest stands. The candidate will do a MITACS internship hosted by Manitoba Hydro to facilitate knowledge transfer and application of the methodology developed from the Quebec case study to Manitoba.

The candidate will actively contribute to the production and interpretation of data and to the writing of scientific manuscripts. He/she will be mainly under the supervision of Marc-André Parisien, Yan Boulanger and Dominique Arseneault and will benefit from the diverse expertise of our team members in the fields of fire ecology, fire spread modelling and statistical modeling. The candidate will be awarded a financial support of $21,000 (Canadian dollars) per year for a period of three years. Additional funding may be available.

We are looking for a candidate with a master degree (MSc) in a relevant field (forestry, biology, geography, environmental sciences). The successful candidate will possess an excellent academic record, as well as strong analytical and problem-solving skills. This person should be able to work with autonomy, curiosity, discipline, motivation and determination and to work effectively within a team and have excellent writing skills. GIS and R programming skills would also be precious assets. Knowledge of French is an asset but is not mandatory.

The project will begin as soon as possible, preferably in September 2017. Interested candidates must submit a letter of motivation, their academic transcripts, as well as the contact information of three references to Dominique Arseneault (dominique_arseneault@uqar.ca).

PHD POSITION IN THEORETICAL COMMUNITY ECOLOGY

We are seeking an enthusiastic candidate with a strong academic record to undertake a PhD in theoretical ecology on the effect of landscape connectivity on the diversity and trophic structure of forest ecological communities.

Project summary: Anthropogenic transformations of landscapes impact ecological community in complex ways. Understanding the relationship between spatial and temporal biodiversity patterns and the processes of habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation constitutes an important challenge for preserving the functioning and structure of forest ecological communities. As part of this project, the student will be in responsible for developing a dynamical model to study the influence of habitat connectivity and species dispersal on diversity and trophic structure within forest metacommunities.

The candidate will enroll in the PhD program in biology and will join the Center for Forest Research under the supervision of Élise Filotas (TÉLUQ) and Daniel Kneeshaw (UQAM).
Starting date: Fall 2017.
Stipend: 20,000$/year for 3 years.

Expertise/ Profile required

  • MSc in biological sciences or related disciplines *AND* good knowledge and skills in modelling and quantitative analysis.

OR

MSc in mathematics or physics *AND* a high motivation to learn community ecology.

  • Familiar with computer programming (R, matlab, C or python).
  • Independent, rigorous and excellent skills in analysis and problem solving.
  • Be able to work and write in French and English (or motivation to do so).

Applicants should provide a copy of their CV and transcripts, a short motivation letter (max 1 page), and the contact information of two referees to: elise.filotas@teluq.ca. Applications will be considered until the position is filled.

POST-DOC OPPORTUNITY IN CONTINENTAL-SCALE AVIAN HABITAT MODELING

We seek a quantitative ecologist and modeller to join an NSERC-funded project on avian conservation in managed boreal forests. In partnership with industry and government, our goal is to forecast bird species responses to the landscape changes that occur through forestry activities at local, regional, and national extents. The successful candidate will work with a team of avian ecologists, forest scientists, statisticians and technical staff to forecast the consequences of alternate forest management and conservation plans and identify forest management practices that best support conservation goals. The forecasting tools will be implemented in SpaDES, a new system for spatial simulation in R (spades.predictiveecology.org). The major component of the work will be designing simulation experiments and ecological indicators to evaluate alternate forest management plans, estimate model forecast error, and design sampling regimes to reduce such errors.

Qualifications:

  • Ph.D. in ecology, forestry, environmental sciences, applied mathematics, computer science, statistics, or a related field;
  • High-level programming skills (e.g., R, Python);
  • Experience with statistical modelling;
  • Experience with spatial simulation modelling;
  • Excellent oral and written communications skills, in English.
  • Experience with any of the following are valuable assets: forest management planning methods and tools; conservation planning methodologies; wildlife-habitat or species distribution modelling; GIS; Remote Sensed data; workflow automation tools; French.

The direct supervisors will be Eliot McIntire (Pacific Forestry Centre, expertise in applied ecology, conservation and ecological forecasting) and Steven Cumming (Université Laval, expertise in forest landscape dynamics, avian habitat modelling, and spatial simulation). Additional collaborators include Erin Bayne (University of Alberta), Fréderic Raulier (Laval), and Marcel Darveau (Laval), post-doctoral fellows and graduate students across Canada, and government research scientists. The successful candidate will be team member of the Boreal Avian Modelling Project (BAM), a long term research program in the ecology and dynamics of avian populations and their habitats in the boreal forest of North America (see www.borealbirds.ca).

Location of tenure: The position will be located in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, at the Pacific Forestry Centre, with travel to Quebec City (Université Laval) and/or Edmonton (University of Alberta) to work with collaborators. No field work is required.

Start date, duration, & compensation: The position will start as soon as possible. The duration is one year, renewable once based on performance. The annual salary is $53,161 Cdn plus benefits.

To Apply: Please provide a letter of interest, your CV, and an example of your writing skills in the form of a peer-reviewed manuscript. Your letter should indicate how you meet each of the criteria, and state when you are able to start and when you can relocate to British Columbia. We will accept applications until a suitable candidate is found, but will begin reviewing as soon as the first is received. Send application packages to:

Nicole Barker, BAM Coordinating Scientist, nbarker@ualberta.ca

M.Sc. Position, University of Regina – Management and conservation of sharp-tailed grouse in Saskatchewan. Closing date: July 1, 2017.

We are looking for an enthusiastic and self-motivated student to lead a project examining factors related to Sharp-tailed Grouse ecology and management in Saskatchewan, Canada.  Using both a field component and statistical modelling, this project will address questions related to climate and habitat factors affecting lek counts and lek habitat
selection.  The successful applicant will be: (1) a motivated team player, (2) interested in a project with broad wildlife management applications, (3) willing to engage with local landowners, conservation and hunting communities in Saskatchewan, industrial partners, and Saskatchewan Ministry of the Environment staff to support this research, (4) capable
of managing a 2-4 person field crew, and (5) willing to apply for various funding opportunities including a MITACS or NSERC scholarship. The project is fully funded, including a graduate student stipend, for the 2017-2018 year.

Applicants will be under the co-supervision of Dr. Chris Somers and Dr. Ryan Fisher (adjunct professor) in the Department of Biology at the University of Regina. To apply for this position please email a copy of your resume/CV, a short cover letter detailing previous experience and why you want to be considered for this position, transcripts, and a list of 2 references to  Chris Somers (chris.somers@uregina) and Ryan Fisher (ryan.fisher@uregina.ca).

Closing date is July 1, 2017 with the expected start date on September 1, 2017, but other arrangements (for earlier or later start dates) can be made.

PhD project on foraging behaviour and population ecology of Canada lynx in Yukon

Institution: Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada (www.trentu.ca)

Supervisors: Dennis Murray (http://www.dennismurray.ca) and Stan Boutin (https://www.ualberta.ca/science/about-us/contact-us/faculty-directory/stan-boutin)

We are seeking a PhD student to assess lynx foraging behavior and population ecology near Kluane Lake, Yukon. Our research on lynx and their prey in the Kluane region spans decades, and the current project builds on our recent re-analysis of the functional response of lynx to different prey types and how such relationships are more complex than previously thought (see Chan et al. 2017 Ecology DOI:10.1002/ecy.1828). Specifically, through lynx GPS telemetry and accelerometry, camera trap surveys, as well as assessment of prey distribution and abundance, we aim to understand the mechanisms underlying lynx interactions with their primary (snowshoe hare) and secondary (red squirrel) prey, and how such interactions affect lynx population ecology through space and time. To date, lynx have been studied intensively for 2 winters during a period of relative abundance of prey, with an anticipated crash in snowshoe hare numbers and corresponding changes in lynx foraging behavior, expected during the next 2 years. These anticipated changes set the stage for robust analysis of variation in lynx: 1) kill rates and movement patterns; 2) exploitation of prey habitat patches; and 3) interactions with conspecifics. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project and be part of a dynamic group of researchers from 4 Canadian universities.

The funding package includes a competitive stipend, foreign tuition waiver (if the student is not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident) as well as coverage of all research expenses. Successful candidates will have an MSc in Ecology, Conservation Biology, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field skills (preferably including carnivore radio-telemetry, chemical immobilization and winter fieldwork), and analysis of GPS telemetry datasets. The successful candidate must be competitive for scholarship funding and be excited about working in a remote field station in the winter for extended periods of time.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references, to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca). The successful candidate will begin enrolment by September 2017 or January 2018, and we will accept applications until a suitable candidate is found, so apply early.

PhD project on boreal forest responses to climate change

Institution: Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada (www.trentu.ca)

Supervisor: Dennis Murray (http://www.dennismurray.ca)

We are initiating a PhD project to assess responses to climate change among native species in Canada’s boreal forest. The boreal forest comprises Canada’s largest biome but its state is rapidly deteriorating, including due to climate change. Our recent findings (Row et al. 2012 Glob. Chan. Biol doi:10.1111/gcb.12526; Murray et al., PLoS (ONE), in press) forecast dire consequences to the boreal forest especially in the boundary region between Ontario-Quebec where disjunct east-west populations of native plants, birds, and mammals, and extensive loss of native biodiversity, likely will arise. Through field sampling, species distribution modeling, population viability analysis, and landscape genetics and adaptive genomics, the PhD student will determine: 1) the current and potential future extent of change in boreal species in the Ontario-Quebec region relative to less-impacted areas; 2) how boreal breakdown may affect population processes and viability of native species in the region; 3) whether invasives are colonizing the region disproportionately quickly compared to other regions; and 4) if native or invasive species in the region demonstrate genome-level evidence of stress or adaptation to environmental change. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project.

The funding package includes a competitive stipend, foreign tuition waiver (if the student is not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident) as well coverage of all research expenses. Successful candidates will have an MSc in Ecology, Conservation Biology, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong quantitative, genetics, and/or field skills, and an interest in working collaboratively as part of a larger group. The PhD student will join the Integrative Wildlife Conservation laboratory at Trent University (www.dennismurray.ca) and be part of an interdisciplinary team addressing innovative solutions to environmental change (www.create-enviro.ca).

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references, to: Dennis Murray (dennismurray@trentu.ca). The successful candidate will begin enrolment at Trent University by September 2017 or January 2018, and we will accept applications until a suitable candidate is found, so apply early.

PhD Positions in Fungal Evolutionary Genetics

The Corradi Lab is currently seeking motivated graduate students (MSc or PhD level).

Students will be supervised by Dr. Nicolas Corradi within a CIFAR (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) – affiliated laboratory located in the Department of Biology of the University of Ottawa, Canada.

Lab Website: http://corradilab.weebly.com/

The selected candidates will pursue and expand work in one of several new exciting research areas in the lab:

1) Environmental genomics of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

2) Metagenomics of eukaryotic intracellular pathogens (Microsporidia, Rozellomycota)

3) Genome and mating-type organization in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal FungiEnquiries about specific projects can be sent to ncorradiATuottawa.ca.

Applicants are expected to have good background in one (or more) of the following areas:

Mycology, Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, Plant-microbe interaction, Amplicon-sequencing analysis, Population Genetics/omics, Comparative genomics.

For international applicants, Fluency in French is desired (but not required).

A complete application package includes 1) a CV, 2) a short description of past research accomplishments and future goals, and 3) the names and e-mail addresses of at least 2 references. Evaluation of applications starts immediately until suitable candidates are found.

The University of Ottawa is a large, research-intensive university, hosting over 40.000 students and located in the downtown core area of Canada’s capital city (http://www.science.uottawa.ca/fac/welcome.html). Ottawa is a vibrant, multicultural city with a very high quality of life (http://www.ottawatourism.ca/fr/)Complete applications can be sent to Dr. Nicolas Corradi (ncorradiATuottawa.ca).

Representative Publications:

  1. Corradi N. and A. Brachmann. Fungal mating in the most widespread plant symbionts? Trends in Plant Sciences 2017, 22 (2), 175–183
  2. Ropars J., Kinga Sędzielewska Toro K. Noel J., Pelin A., Charron P., Farinelli L., Marton T., Krüger M., Fuchs J., Brachmann, and N. Corradi. Evidence for the sexual origin of heterokaryosis in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi. Nature Microbiology 1(6): 16033, 2016.
  3. Corradi N. Microsporidia: Intracellular Parasites Shaped by Gene Loss and Horizontal Gene Transfer. Annual Review of Microbiology 69 (1): 167-183. 2015
  4. Pelin A., Selman M., Laurent Farinelli, Aris-Brosou and N. Corradi. Genome analyses suggest the presence of polyploidy and recent human-driven expansions in eight global populations of the honeybee pathogen Nosema ceranae. Environmental Microbiology 17 (11): 4443-4458, 2015.
  5. Riley R., Charron P., Idnurm A., Farinelli L., Dalpé Y., Martin F. and Corradi. Extreme Diversification of the MATA-HMG Gene Family in the Plant – Associated Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi. New Phytologist 201(1): 254–268, 2014.

 


Associate Director, Sharks and Rays Program, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)

Background

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) saves wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature. In addition to its global conservation programs across 60 countries, WCS manages five zoos, including the Bronx Zoo, and the New York Aquarium. WCS’s Marine Conservation Program works in over 20 countries and all five oceans to protect key marine habitats and marine wildlife, to end overfishing, and to protect key species groups, including marine mammals, sharks and rays, and corals, as well as to inspire an ocean constituency.
WCS has made an institutional commitment to the conservation of sharks and rays globally, and to raise awareness on need to protect these species. WCS includes sharks and rays as one of six priority species groups in the WCS: 2020 Strategic Plan. WCS has also convened a partnership – the Global Sharks and Rays Initiative (GSRI) – to develop and implement a 10-year global strategy for the conservation of these species. In addition, WCS is poised to open the new Ocean Wonders exhibit as part of the New York Aquarium, a $120 million investment that features sharks and rays.

WCS has significantly expanded its Sharks and Rays Program to support scaling-up of shark and ray conservation efforts around the world. Goals of this effort are to: save shark and ray species from extinction; transition fisheries to sustainability; effectively control international trade; and reduce demand for shark and ray products from unsustainable sources. The WCS Sharks and Rays Program consists of scientific research and monitoring; conservation programs; policy reform at local, national and multinational levels; and outreach and education. WCS seeks an Associate Director to manage the Sharks and Rays Program.

To Apply

Please apply online at http://www.wcs.org/about-us/careers and send a cover letter and CV with the subject line “Associate Director, Sharks and Rays – [your name]” to marineprogram@wcs.org. Applications received prior to April 25 will receive priority, but applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Position Description

The Associate Director manages the global WCS Sharks and Rays Program. Based in WCS’s Global Conservation Program headquarters located in the Bronx Zoo, NY, the Associate Director reports to the Executive Director of WCS Marine Conservation Program, coordinates with the Vice President of Species Conservation, leads the WCS Sharks and Rays Program Team, and plays a central role with the WCS Marine Conservation Team. This is a full-time position with benefits.

Position Responsibilities

The Associate Director of the Sharks and Rays Program develops and oversees the program’s strategic direction, manages the program activities in science, conservation and policy, and coordinates shark and ray activities throughout WCS, including with the New York Aquarium. In addition to program management, overall responsibilities include development and fundraising, and communications and marketing, relating to the Sharks and Rays Program, in conjunction with relevant WCS departments. The Associate Director supervises the Marine Policy Advisor/Sharks and Rays Coordinator and will shape additional staffing needs. With oversight and coordination by the Associate Director, administration and support for the Sharks and Rays Program are provided by the Marine Program Manager (finances), Marine Program Officer, and Marine Program Assistant.

Specific responsibilities include:

Program development and management

  • Advancing the strategic development and implementation of WCS’s global Sharks and Rays Program (working with the Marine Policy Advisor/Sharks and Rays Coordinator);
  • Developing and overseeing workplans, activities, and outputs to ensure timely completion of deliverables and achievement of Program goals;
  • Overseeing Program responsibilities relating to data collection, analysis, publication, and sharing, which support delivery of the WCS sharks and rays strategy and GSRI global strategy;
  • Guiding and coordinating with field programs to achieve goals of the Sharks and Rays Program in conjunction with regional and country conservation goals, through regular engagement, communication with regional and country directors, and HQ staff;
  • Coordinating between the global conservation work of the WCS Sharks and Rays Program and the exhibits and outreach through the New York Aquarium;
  • Facilitating consultancies, partnerships and relationships globally, regionally and locally in support of the Program and the GSRI (working with the Marine Policy Advisor/Sharks and Rays Coordinator);
  • Developing the annual budget and managing the finances of the Sharks and Rays Program;
  • In coordination with the Marine Policy Advisor/Sharks and Rays Coordinator, representing the Sharks and Rays Program at meetings, conferences, donor events, etc.

Development and Fundraising

  • Overseeing fundraising to ensure necessary funds exist for the implementation of the WCS Sharks and Rays Program and related projects and activities;
  • In conjunction with WCS Global Resources, developing and maintaining relationships with funders and donors, including international and domestic public agencies, private donors, foundations and corporations;
  • Preparing and reviewing funding proposals and related reports, including narratives and budgets, in support of the Program.

Communication

  • Representing the WCS Sharks and Rays Program to external audiences;
  • Developing and coordinating programmatic communications between and among WCS staff, including Public Affairs and Global Resources, as well as external partners, donors 
and the general public, regarding program research, results and accomplishments;
  • Writing, editing, and designing programmatic reports, outreach materials and other 
communications;
  • Facilitating and maintaining constant coordination, collaboration and active dialogue 
between WCS staff and external partners, and supporting the strong and transparent governance of the GSRI partnership.

Experience and Qualifications

  • PhD, Master’s Degree or similar graduate degree in a relevant discipline, such as marine/fisheries biology, natural sciences, or conservation policy;
  • 7-10 years of relevant work experience, including project management and administration, fundraising and development, field research and conservation, finance and operations;
  • Relevant subject-matter expertise and experience, including understanding of general conservation issues, experience in species and/or marine conservation, and familiarity with shark and ray conservation issues and institutions;
  • Excellent leadership and management skills, with an ability to inspire a team and oversee/manage multiple projects simultaneously;
  • Excellent communication skills in writing, editing, and oral presentations;
  • Excellent interpersonal skills and a strong team player;
  • Effective at both collaborative and independent work;
  • Ability to both take initiative and work as part of a geographically scattered team;
  • Foreign language fluency (e.g., French, Spanish) highly desirable;
  • Familiarity with relevant software and technologies, including the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation, and Miradi, highly desirable; and
  • Willingness to travel internationally essential.

Compensation and Benefits

Salary commensurate with experience. WCS offers a competitive compensation package including medical/dental insurance, 401(k) retirement plan, pension plan, life insurance, disability insurance, paid sick leave and generous vacation.

Work Environment and Physical Demands

The physical demands and work environment described above are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform these essential functions. 
WCS is an equal opportunity employer and encourages applications from diverse candidates.