Population estimate and habitat characterization of the Northern Barrens Tiger Beetle (Cicindela patruela Dejean) from Île-aux-Allumettes (Quebec)

A MSc position is available under the co-supervision of Dr. Clint Kelly (Université du Québec à Montréal, www.kellylab.weebly.com), Dr. Maxim Larrivée (Insectarium de Montréal), and Dr. Michel Saint-Germain (Insectarium de Montréal) beginning September 2018.

The Northern Barrens Tiger Beetle is extremely rare in Canada and is considered endangered nationally. It is associated with old dune systems and is found in highly specialized habitat that tends to disappear in the absence of natural disturbances. The population from Île-aux-Allumettes was rediscovered in 2016 and is one of two known populations in Canada. The actual extent of this population is not known, as is how individuals use the different micro-habitats that make up this relatively diverse area in terms of successional stages. This research project aims to better define the extent of this Northern Barrens Tiger Beetle population and to identify its micro-habitat preferences and requirements. The project could include, among other things, a characterization of the conditions sought for egg-laying, foraging and thermoregulating. The final objectives of the project will be agreed on with the chosen candidate. The project will include field work during the summer of 2019.

This project will be conducted under the auspices of ReNewZoo (www.renewzoo.ca) and aims to train students for future employment in zoo conservation science. Students will be paid a stipend of $17,500 for each of two years. ReNewZoo has mandatory components (see details at www.renewzoo.ca) in addition to those of the Département des Sciences biologiques (UQAM) including a 4-month internship at Insectarium de Montréal and coursework.

The candidate must have completed a B.Sc. degree in Biology or a related discipline, have an interest in field work and work in zoological institutions. Interested candidates should submit a brief letter of intent, a curriculum vitae and an unofficial transcript to contacts below. UQAM is a linguistically open environment, however, graduate-level classes are taught in French.

The Kelly Lab is a member of the Groupe de recherche en écologie comportementale et animale (GRECA), which is a part of the large, research-active Département des Sciences Biologiques at UQAM (https://bio.uqam.ca) in the heart of Montréal.

If interested, please send a letter of intent, academic transcripts and a CV to Clint Kelly (kelly.clint@uqam.ca) and Maxim Larrivée (maxim.larrivee@ville.montreal.qc.ca).

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Habitat preferences and occurrence of the common walking stick (Diapheromera femorata) in Québec

A MSc position is available under the co-supervision of Dr. Clint Kelly (Université du Québec à Montréal, www.kellylab.weebly.com), Dr. Maxim Larrivée (Insectarium de Montréal), and Dr. Michel Saint-Germain (Insectarium de Montréal) beginning September 2018.

We are seeking a keen and curious student with a strong interest in conservation biology to develop and test a model of habitat preference and occupancy for the common walking stick (Diapheromera femorata). This species is common across North America but is known to occur in only three locations in Quebec (Mont Royal, Gatineau Park, and near the US border). Given that suitable habitat exists in other locations across Quebec, D. femorata is likely more widespread than is currently believed. By integrating knowledge of climate, topography and vegetative composition, the student will generate and test predictions of D. femorata occurrence throughout the province. The student will also assess behavioural and genetic differences among known Québec populations.

This project will be conducted under the auspices of ReNewZoo (www.renewzoo.ca) and aims to train students for future employment in zoo conservation science. Students will be paid a stipend of $17,500 for each of two years. ReNewZoo has mandatory components (see details at www.renewzoo.ca) in addition to those of the Département des Sciences biologiques (UQAM) including a 4-month internship at Insectarium de Montréal and coursework.

The candidate must have completed a B.Sc. degree in Biology or a related discipline, have an interest in field work and work in zoological institutions. Interested candidates should submit a brief letter of intent, a curriculum vitae and an unofficial transcript to contacts below. UQAM is a linguistically open environment, however, graduate-level classes are taught in French.

The Kelly Lab is a member of the Groupe de recherche en écologie comportementale et animale (GRECA), which is a part of the large, research-active Département des Sciences Biologiques at UQAM (https://bio.uqam.ca) in the heart of Montréal.

If interested, please send a letter of intent, academic transcripts and a CV to Clint Kelly (kelly.clint@uqam.ca) and Maxim Larrivée (maxim.larrivee@ville.montreal.qc.ca).

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3-year PhD position in Animal Physiology and Behavioural Ecology with Dr Jean-Patrice Robin and Dr Pierre Bize at the University of Strasbourg, France. Application deadline: 17/06/2018.

Exploring the impact and adaptation to social and environmental stress in the king penguin

King penguins are unique by their biology: they reproduce in an aggressive social environment and extreme environmental conditions, and parents alternate long fasting periods on land with intense foraging periods at sea. Furthermore, both sexes display conspicuous ornaments used in sexual and social contexts. We have previously demonstrated that king penguins are sensitive to their neighbours: breeders get stressed when reproducing in socially dense environments and they rely on the size of their auricular patch to establish social dominance. In this project, we aim to explore further inter-individual physiological and behavioural variation in responses to social stress, and in particular to test whether some individuals are better adapted to cope with social stress, what make them better adapted to stress and whether individuals can signal their social competences. Research will be carried on the Sub-Antarctic Island Crozet, and the applicant should have a keen interest in doing experimental work in free living birds and to embrace an integrative approach, addressing changes in states ranging from the cell to the whole organism level. This project will rely both on newly data collected by the candidate in the field over up to 2 expeditions in sub-Antarctica and on archived data, thereby allowing the candidate to start the PhD project without delay and guarantying results on the project.

For this PhD project we are seeking somebody who is independent, mobile, creative, highly motivated, and has interest in animal physiology and behavioural and evolutionary ecology. Our ideal candidate has previous experience working in the field (preferentially with birds), likes working in a team, has excellent written and oral communication skills in English, and is not afraid of statistics and lab work. Experience with programing in R (or other languages such as SQML or Matlab) and with lab work is not essential but is a welcome addition; the willingness to learn such techniques is, however, crucial.

The successful applicant will be mainly based in the Department of Ecology, Physiology & Ethology (DEPE) at the University of Strasbourg, France, under the joined supervision of Dr Jean-Patrice Robin (Strasbourg) and Dr Pierre Bize (University of Aberdeen, UK). The DEPE is a lively Department where the student will benefit from interaction with a thriving community of postgraduate students, postdocs and researchers in animal physiology, marine biology and behavioural ecology. Furthermore, the student will integrate an international team working on the French Polar Program ‘ECOENERGY’, and will thus benefit from the interaction and support of research partners, namely Vincent Viblanc and Yves Handrich (Strasbourg, France), Quentin Schull (MARBEC, France), Antoine Stier (Turku Univ., Finland), Steve Dobson (Auburn Univ, U.S.A.) and Rudy Boonstra (Toronto Univ., Canada). The student will be encouraged to visit the partners to conduct specific analysis. The student will participate in the PhD program of the Doctoral School ED414 of the University of Strasbourg (http://ed.vie-sante.unistra.fr/) providing additional learning of transferable skills.

Strasbourg is one of Europe’s most attractive cities. It has a rich historical and architectural heritage, with Strasbourg’s historical city centre being listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Its human size, its pedestrian city centre and 500 km of cycling paths make it a very pleasant city to wander around. Vibrant and affordable, Strasbourg is a true student city providing a great learning and living environment (Check out the New York Time’s video: 36 Hours in Strasbourg).

Applications must include 1) a cover letter outlining why you want to work on this project, 2) a detailed curriculum vitae, 3) the contact details of two academic referees, and 4) a 1‐page summary of your MSc project or undergraduate work. Please send the above as a single pdf file to both jean-patrice.robin@iphc.cnrs.fr AND pierre.bize@abdn.ac.uk

Application deadline is 17/06/2018 23:00 – Europe/Brussels; interviews will take on July 13th; starting date is Sept 17th. The PhD project is fully funded for 3 years by the IDEX program from the University of Strasbourg; monthly salary of €1769

For more information, feel free to contact Jean-Patrice Robin or Pierre Bize.
https://euraxess.ec.europa.eu/jobs/303818

Suggested reading

Schull Q, Dobson FS, Stier A, Robin J-P, Bize P, Viblanc VA. 2016. Beak color dynamically signals changes in fasting status and parasite loads in king penguins. Behavioral Ecology 27:1684-1693

Schull Q, Robin J-P, Dobson FS, Saadaoui H, Viblanc VA, Bize P. 2018. Experimental stress during molt suggests the evolution of condition-dependent and condition-independent ornaments in the king penguin. Ecology and Evolution 8(2):1084-1095.

Stier A, Romestaing C, Schull Q, Lefol E, Robin J-P, Roussel D, Bize P. 2017. How to measure mitochondrial function in birds using red blood cells: a case study in the king penguin and perspectives in ecology and evolution. Methods in Ecology and Evolution 8:1172–1182

Viblanc VA, Gineste B, Stier A, Robin J-P, Groscolas R. 2014. Stress hormones in relation to breeding status and territory location in colonial king penguin: a role for social density? Oecologia:1-10.

Viblanc VA, Dobson FS, Stier A, Schull Q, Saraux C, Gineste B, Pardonnet S, Kauffmann M, Robin J-P, Bize P. 2016. Mutually honest? Physiological ‘qualities’ signalled by colour ornaments in monomorphic king penguins. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 118:200-214.

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M.Sc. Opportunity: Incorporating Indigenous Knowledge in Moose Ecology, Laurentian University/Université Laurentienne.

Description

Moose populations in North America are starting to decline with reasons not well understood. Moose are the primary source of protein for many Indigenous groups and preserving this species is not only important in terms of food acquisition and sustaining ecological integrity, but essential for securing traditional ways of life and cultural values associated with this species. An M.Sc. student will investigate the demographics of declining moose populations in Ontario with a focus on integrating Indigenous Knowledge with western science techniques. The M.Sc. candidate will be based out of Laurentian University and will collaborate with Dr. Jesse Popp, Dr. Frank Mallory, the Anishinabek/Ontario Fisheries Resource Centre, and Indigenous communities within the Anishinabek Nation. 

Qualifications

Competitive candidates will have completed a Bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Ecology, Zoology, or a related field with a grade average of 75% or higher. Experience in large mammal ecology, and Indigenous cultural settings considered an asset. All applicants will be considered; however, preference will be given to Canadian citizens.

Anticipated Start Date

As soon as possible. 

Stipend

~$17,000 per year

How to Apply

Please email your unofficial transcript, resume, a list of 3 references, and a cover letter describing your related experience and why you should be considered for the position to: Dr. Jesse N. Popp, Adjunct Professor, Department of Biology, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, ON. P3E 2C6, jpopp@laurentian.ca

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M.Sc./Ph.D. Opportunity, Department of Soil Science Department, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

Project title

Development and function of arctic and alpine biological soil crust communities

Project summary

In alpine and arctic environments, Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs) are often a dominant vegetation unit, making these ecosystems a uniquely powerful model for examining the role of BSCs in terrestrial ecosystem development. The first goal in this series of projects is to determine the initial and realized niche ranges of key species found in BSCs. While determining species niche ranges is needed for successful restoration of alpine and tundra plant communities, long-term ecosystem recovery and health is ultimately dependent on restoration of key ecosystem processes. Therefore, our second goal is to link niche construction with the recovery of ecosystem functions for key BSC species. We will achieve these goals by determining niche ranges and recovery of key ecosystem processes under both natural recolonization and active restoration. Optima and niche ranges for key macro and micro BSC phyla will be determined through characterization of BSCs in relation to key microclimate and soil physicochemical factors along subarctic alpine chronosequences, tundra drilling waste materials and mine site tailings. Manipulative growth chamber and field experiments will assist in the confirmation of niche ranges and help to develop BSC restoration techniques.

Expectations

There are opportunities for both M.Sc. and Ph.D. positions.

  • Background in soil and/or plant sciences
  • Interest in plant-soil systems, non-vascular plant communities, soil microbial composition and function
  • Field work in remote locations including soil sampling, moss and lichen identification
  • Experience with molecular analyses/data considered an asset

The expected starting date for the 2-year M.Sc. and 3-year Ph.D. positions vary from July 1, 2018 to January 1, 2019.

The stipend for the M.Sc. position is $22,680 per year and $27,018 for the Ph.D. position.

Interested candidates should submit a statement of interest, CV and three references, unofficial transcripts and a sample of writing to Dr. Katherine Stewart, Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan (katherine.stewart@usask.ca). For more information please contact Dr. Stewart.

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PROPOSITION de DOCTORAT PhD, BIOLOGIE ÉVOLUTIVE, Département de Sciences Biologiques de l’Université de Montréal. Date limite pour poser sa candidature: 1er août 2018.

PROJET : La moule bleue Mytilus edulis est le plus important mollusque cultivé et donc un moteur économique considérable dans la région du Golfe du Saint-Laurent (Pêches et Océans Canada), et un des plus important ailleurs dans le monde. Jadis prospères jusqu’au sud de la Caroline du Nord, M. edulis a subi un déclin inquiétant aux cours des dernières années dans les provinces de l’Atlantique et aux États-Unis. Différentes hypothèses ont été soulevées pour expliquer les raisons de ce déclin : la surexploitation, l’acidification des océans, la pollution, les maladies, l’augmentation des prédateurs et le réchauffement climatique. Notamment, le réchauffement climatique a servit d’hypothèse dans plusieurs autres études pour expliquer le déclin ou le déplacement de populations de moules bleues, un résultat qui pourrait être attribuable, entre-autre, à une modification drastique du sex-ratio (ie. le rapport du nombre de mâles et de femelles au sein d’une population), qui pourrait mettre en péril la viabilité de certaines populations. En effet, les moules marines et les huitres sont connues pour avoir un sex-ratio régulé par l’environnement. Cependant, contrairement aux huitres, très peu d’études se sont intéressées aux mécanismes de détermination du sexe chez la moule marine. Une raison majeure d’étudier le déterminisme sexuel chez les moules se rapporte à leur importance économique et nutritionnelle. Il est communément admis que le succès des élevages est pour une part importante lié aux caractéristiques des populations de reproducteurs (naturelles ou captives), et qu’il faut notamment parvenir à en contrôler les sex-ratios, les périodes de reproduction, les fécondité et fertilité.

Ce projet financé par le FRQNT vise à mieux comprendre les mécanismes génétiques et épigénétiques de la détermination du sexe chez la moule bleue. Par conséquent, le candidat doit avoir une expérience ou un intérêt marqué pour la bio-informatique, la biologie évolutive et la biologie moléculaire.

FINANCEMENT : Une bourse de 15 000$/année est offerte pour trois ans. De plus, plusieurs postes d’auxiliaires en enseignement sont disponibles, permettant d’accroître les revenus.

PROGRAMME : Doctorat en Biologie, Ph.D. (UdeM). Début suggéré : Automne 2018 ou hiver 2019.

DÉPÔT DE LA CANDIDATURE : Veuillez faire parvenir une lettre de présentation, un curriculum vitae et une copie de votre relevé de notes universitaires accompagnés des noms et adresses de deux références avant le 1er août 2018 à : Sophie Breton, Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal, Montréal (Québec), Canada.

s.breton@umontreal.ca (514) 343-6111 poste 7460.

 Veuillez prendre note que seules les personnes retenues pour une entrevue (en personne, par skype ou par téléphone) seront contactées.

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Utah State University: Fully funded PhD Assistantship – Animal space-use behavior and demography (joint supervision by Dr. Dan MacNulty and Dr. Tal Avgar).

The successful applicant will advance understanding about the demographic consequences of space-use behavior in free-living large-vertebrate systems. Research will focus on the northern Yellowstone elk population, which migrates annually to summer ranges throughout Yellowstone National Park. The successful applicant will examine how elk movement and resource-selection varies with elk density, resource availability, and predation risk (from wolves, grizzly bears, and cougars), and how these individual space-use behaviors affect survival and reproduction. Research will be conducted in collaboration with agency scientists and will involve cutting-edge analyses of several long-term datasets as well as field work in Yellowstone. Desired start date: August 27, 2018. The assistantship includes tuition and fees, health insurance, travel stipend, and a yearly stipend of $20k for up to four years. The candidate will be expected to apply for additional funding such as the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and S. J. and Jesse E. Quinney Doctoral Research Fellowship. Minimum qualifications: MSc in ecology, wildlife biology, conservation biology, or related field; GRE scores (for both verbal and quantitative) ≥70th percentile and cumulative GPA ≥3.50. Competitive applicants will have experience collecting, analyzing, presenting, and publishing field data, working collaboratively with agency and academic scientists, and strong interests in developing and applying quantitative models of animal space-use behavior, predator-prey interactions, and demography. Applicants should email the following materials as a single pdf file with the subject line “PhD Assistantship” to dan.macnulty@usu.edu avgart@gmail.com: (a) one page cover letter describing relevant experience, interests, and professional goals, (b) CV, (c) GRE scores, (d) transcripts (unofficial) from undergraduate and graduate education, (f) scientific writing sample (an academic paper or report written primarily by the applicant), and (e) contact information for three professional references. Consideration of interested applicants begins immediately and continues until the position is filled.

Utah State University (http://www.usu.edu) is a Research I (Extensive Doctoral) land-grant institution with a student body of over 24,000, 42 departments, 8 academic colleges, a school of Graduate Studies, and diverse research programs. The main campus is located in Logan, a community of 100,000 people. Logan is 85 miles north of Salt Lake City in scenic Cache Valley, a semi-rural mountain basin with nearby ski resorts, lakes, rivers, and mountains providing many recreational opportunities. The area has a low cost of living and provides a high quality of life. For more information on Logan see http://www.tourcachevalley.com.

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PhD position

Title
Land sharing versus land sparing revisited: Modelling the long-term dynamics of human populations, land use and ecosystem services.

Context
The world’s population is largely urban and is continuing to grow, with estimates that by 2050 about 70% of the global population will live in cities. This purging of the rural population creates a positive feedback, further industrializing agricultural and natural resource extraction, which degrades the environment and forces individuals to relocate (Dandekar and Hibbard 2016). The link between human population growth and nature is often described as exogenous. However, the dependence of humans on nature is becoming increasingly clear, especially when it comes to feeding the growing population.

The land sharing versus sparing debate attempts to find a balance between agricultural and natural areas. Despite the breadth of the literature on this topic, there are many gaps in the context of increasing socio-economic globalization. Grau at al. (2013) suggested expanding theoretical and empirical research beyond the landscape and ecoregion scales by evaluating environmental heterogeneity and long-distance interactions in a globalized world.

Objective
This PhD project aims to determine what configuration of rural and urban populations and land compositions generates the most sustainable path in the future for humans and the environment; investigate how human populations and ecosystem services are impacted by patterns of land use at national or global scales; and determine how changes in biodiversity impact rural-urban relocation.

This project is part of a larger project aimed at building a theory of the long-term dynamics of human-nature interactions, in which feedbacks from changes in biodiversity through changes in ecosystem services are taken into account (Lafuite & Loreau 2016; Lafuite et al. 2017; Cazalis et al. 2018).

Methods

  1. Analyse data on rural land change and urban land change; urban/rural population change; and transitions in agricultural practices.
  2. Create a spatial model of urban and rural spaces, including the human population in each space. First on a national scale and then on a global scale.
  3. Compare different configurations of land: urban, rural (intensive, organic, subsistence). Incorporate different sizes and patterns of rural and urban spaces.
  4. Incorporate the impact of biodiversity on agricultural and natural resource exploitation and explore the effect on human dispersal patterns (see Fahrig 2001 for details).
  5. Create a global network model with various connections between urban and rural spaces within two regions to compare the influence of globalization of land use on human population and ecosystem services maintenance.

Supervision
The PhD candidate will be supervised by Michel Loreau and Kirsten Henderson at the Centre for Biodiversity Theory and Modelling, based at the Theoretical and Experimental Ecology Station in Moulis, France (http://www.cbtm-moulis.com). The mission of the Centre is to foster and perform innovative theoretical research into the ecological and societal causes and consequences of biodiversity changes.

Student requirements
– Experience programming (R, SciLab, MATLAB, Python, etc.)
– Knowledge of calculus and modelling experience, spatial network models is an asset – Creativity and independence
– Ability to read and write in English

Applications
To apply, e-mail a letter of application, a CV, a brief statement of research interests, and the names and email addresses of three references to Michel Loreau and Kirsten Henderson via Dalila Booth <dalila.booth@sete.cnrs.fr>.

References

  1. Cazalis, V., Loreau, M. & Henderson, K. (2018). Do we have to choose between feeding the human population and conserving nature? Modelling the global dependence of people on ecosystem services. Science of the Total Environment 634: 1463-1474.
  2. Dandekar, H. C. & Hibbard, M. (2016). Rural issues in urban planning: current trends and reflections. International Planning Studies 21: 225-229.
  1. Fahrig, L. (2001). How much habitat is enough? Biological conservation 100: 65-74.
  2. Grau, R., Kuemmerle, T. & Macchi, L. (2013). Beyond ‘land sparing versus land sharing’: environmental heterogeneity, globalization and the balance between agricultural production and nature conservation. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 5: 477-483.
  3. Lafuite, A.-S. & Loreau, M. (2017). Time-delayed biodiversity feedbacks and the sustainability of social-ecological systems. Ecological Modelling 351: 96-108.
  4. Lafuite, A.-S., de Mazancourt, C. & Loreau, M. (2017). Delayed behavioural shifts undermine the sustainability of social-ecological systems. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 284: 20171192.

Keywords: Modelling, Theoretical Ecology, Biodiversity, Land use, Rural vs urban, Human population

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PhD Student Position Available on Marine Intertidal Ecology – Université du Québec à Chicoutimi

Multistress effects on key species, biodiversity and functioning of intertidal communities

Project:

Marine coasts are at threat and are changing. Different natural and human disturbances and stressors alter the abundance of multiple marine organisms with unknown consequences for coastal biodiversity and marine ecosystem functioning. We look for a PhD student to join our newly funded project that aims to evaluate the cumulative effects of natural and human stressors on dominant foundation species (macroalgae and grazers) in the intertidal zones of the St Lawrence estuary in Canada.

The project will involve field sampling (observations and manipulation) as well as laboratory essays.

Required skills

The candidate must have a MSc in biology, marine science, environmental science or another closely related field. The candidate’s past achievements and experience must demonstrate that they have a strong aptitude for research. They must also possess strong skills in organization, communication, and scientific writing, and a good knowledge in statistical analyses. The successful candidate will be located at Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Canada. Knowledge of French is advantageous but not obligatory.

Interested persons are kindly requested to submit their candidacy (by email only) to: mathieu.cusson@uqac.ca. The email must include:

  • A cover letter (maximum of two pages) signed by the applicant and explaining the reasons that motivate their application to this position;
  • A curriculum vitae containing all relevant information for this application (including the contact information of two persons who can act as references).

Application deadline: April 15, 2018 starting date: June 1st, 2018 (or September 1st, 2018)

We will communicate only with candidates selected for an interview.
The selection process will continue until a suitable candidate has been found.

Mathieu Cusson, Ph. D.
Associate Professor
Département des sciences fondamentales
Université du Québec à Chicoutimi
555, boulevard de l’Université
Chicoutimi (Québec)
G7H 2B1 Canada
Mathieu.Cusson@uqac.ca Web : http://www.uqac.ca/lasa/en/research-2/marine-biology/

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Projet de Maîtrise disponible – Université du Québec à Chicoutimi

Variabilité spatiale des caractéristiques des communautés intertidales de divers écosystèmes côtiers du Saint-Laurent

Contexte

Le littoral, lieu le plus habité et utilisé par l’homme (activités économiques, culturelles, récréotouristiques, etc.), possède des habitats remplissant plusieurs rôles importants dans le fonctionnement des écosystèmes marins, tout en offrant des services écosystémiques diversifiés aux humains. Paradoxalement, la localisation des écosystèmes sur les côtes de l’estuaire et du Golfe du Saint-Laurent n’est pas encore établie et une évaluation des services des écosystèmes côtiers reste inexistante.

Objectifs

Estimer des valeurs de biomasse, de productivité, de diversité, de stockage du carbone de divers écosystèmes, de ; ii) comparer les sites établis à ceux dégradés; et iii) d’établir des liens génétiques entre les populations des écosystèmes ciblés. Ces travaux, faits en collaboration entre quatre universités, génèreront des résultats importants en écologie et ajouteront un éclairage sur les liens entre la biodiversité, les fonctions et les services offerts par les écosystèmes.

Le candidat doit avoir un BSc en biologie, en sciences marines, en environnement ou autres domaines connexes. Ses occupations passées devront démontrer qu’il détient un bon dossier académique avec des réalisations pertinentes. Il devra aussi montrer ses bonnes capacités organisationnelles, de communications et d’écritures scientifiques.

L’étude des demandes commencera en avril 2018

Les personnes intéressées sont priées de soumettre leur candidature uniquement par courriel à l’adresse suivante : mathieu.cusson@uqac.ca. Ce courriel devra comprendre :

  • Une lettre de présentation expliquant les raisons qui motivent à appliquer sur ce poste;
  • Un curriculum vitae contenant toute l’information pertinente à l’évaluation de la candidature (dont l’adresse de deux répondants).

Nous communiquerons uniquement avec les personnes retenues pour une entrevue. Le processus de sélection se continuera tant que le poste n’est pas pourvu.

Mathieu Cusson, Ph. D.
Professeur agrégé
Département des sciences fondamentales
Université du Québec à Chicoutimi
555, boulevard de l’Université
Chicoutimi (Québec)
G7H 2B1 Canada
Mathieu.Cusson@uqac.ca

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