Ph.D. project : Forecasting the spread of spruce budworm outbreaks

Context

The spruce budworm  (SBW,  Choristoneura fumiferana) is the most important defoliating insect of coniferous stands in North America. In 2017, this insect affected an area of 7 million hectares, more than 12% of Quebec’s boreal forest.

The frequency of SBW outbreaks has changed over the last century, and both their frequency and severity are expected to increase due to climate change. Thus, if we could improve our capacity to forecast which areas will be affected by an ongoing outbreak, the economic (timber loss and growth reduction) and ecological (carbon emissions) impacts of the outbreaks could be partly mitigated.

Objectives and Methodology

This project aims to develop spatiotemporal models of the spread of SBW outbreaks at the scale of Quebec, as a function of the climate and the structure of the forest landscape. Those models will synthesize various sources of data already available (aerial surveys, remote sensing, dendrochronological series). Several advanced approaches to ecological modeling (hierarchical models, machine learning) will be used and the resulting models will be evaluated on their ability to predict the dynamics of an outbreak after being trained on data from the previous outbreak. Access to Compute Canada supercomputers will allow the application of complex models to large datasets.

Keywords: sustainable forest management, climate change, forest ecology, spatial modelling, natural disturbances.

Location: The student will be based at the Forest Research Institute (IRF; https://www.uqat.ca/programmes/irf/) at the Rouyn-Noranda or Amos campus of the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, and will be co-supervised by Philippe Marchand (https://bit.ly/2DFyGl6) and Miguel Montoro Girona (https://bit.ly/34LfttX). The IRF is dynamic, multicultural and international and provides a quality environment for students to develop their research, with 12 professors and more than 60 graduate students working on very diverse topics such as forest dynamics, silviculture, genetics, biodiversity, ecophysiology and sustainable forest management. IRF students also benefit from professional development resources and opportunities (scholarships, participation in conferences, workshops) offered by the Centre for Forest Research (www.cef-cfr.ca). In addition, the student will be a member of the Chair in Sustainable Forest Management (http://chaireafd.uqat.ca/). As part of this project, the student will also have the option of completing an international internship funded with our collaborators in the United States (Harvard University) or the Netherlands (Wageningen University).

Funding: $21,000 annual scholarship for 3 years.

Preferred qualifications: Master’s in ecology or forestry with an interest in statistics and modelling, OR Master’s in mathematics, statistics, geomatics or informatics, with an interest in their environmental applications in a context of climate change.

Preferred start date: Summer or Fall 2020

Project collaborators: Yves Bergeron (UQAT), Mathieu Bouchard (MFFP), Louis De Grandpré (SCF), Matthew Duveneck (Harvard), Élise Filotas (TÉLUQ), Anouschka Hof (Wageningen), Hubert Morin (UQAC), Pierre Therrien (MFFP).

Are you ready to begin your Ph.D. on this fascinating topic? Send your CV, a cover letter, a transcript and contact information for two references to Philippe Marchand (philippe.marchand@uqat.ca) and Miguel Montoro Girona (miguel.montoro@uqat.ca). Review of applications will start on January 20, 2020 and continue until the position is filled. A professional adventure in the great boreal forest of Abitibi awaits you!

Links :

Abitibi-Témiscamingue Tourism : https://www.abitibi-temiscamingue-tourism.org/

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M.Sc. project: Historical impact of climate on the defoliation of black spruce by the spruce budworm

Context

The spruce budworm  (SBW,  Choristoneura fumiferana) is the most important defoliating insect of coniferous stands in North America. In 2017, this insect affected an area of 7 million hectares, more than 12% of Quebec’s boreal forest.

Black spruce, one of the most abundant and economically important species in the boreal forest, is relatively resistant to SBW outbreaks. However, studies have shown that a warming climate, creating greater synchronicity between the emergence of black spruce buds and SBW larvae, would increase the susceptibility of this species to future outbreaks.

Objectives and Methodology

This project aims to determine the interaction between climate and defoliation caused by SBW on the growth of forest stands in the 20th century throughout Quebec. We will use existing dendrochronological (tree ring measurements) databases  for black spruce and the other SBW-affected species, white spruce and balsam fir, to model their growth as a function of climate in the presence or absence of an outbreak (https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2018.01905). Hierarchical models will allow dendrochronological series to be combined with other sources of information on outbreaks (e.g. aerial surveys since 1968) and produce more accurate maps of the historical progression of SBW activity. Access to Compute Canada supercomputers will allow the application of complex models to large datasets.

Keywords: sustainable forest management, climate change, forest ecology, dendrochronology, natural disturbances.

Location: The student will be based at the Forest Research Institute (IRF; https://www.uqat.ca/programmes/irf/) at the Rouyn-Noranda or Amos campus of the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, and will be co-supervised by Philippe Marchand (https://bit.ly/2DFyGl6) and Miguel Montoro Girona (https://bit.ly/34LfttX). The IRF is dynamic, multicultural and international and provides a quality environment for students to develop their research, with 12 professors and more than 60 graduate students working on very diverse topics such as forest dynamics, silviculture, genetics, biodiversity, ecophysiology and sustainable forest management. IRF students also benefit from professional development resources and opportunities (scholarships, participation in conferences, workshops) offered by the Centre for Forest Research (www.cef-cfr.ca). In addition, the student will be a member of the Chair in Sustainable Forest Management (http://chaireafd.uqat.ca/). As part of this project, the student will also have the option of completing an international internship funded with our collaborators in the United States (Harvard University) or the Netherlands (Wageningen University).

Funding: $18,000 annual scholarship for 2 years.

Preferred qualifications: Undergraduate degree in biology, ecology, environmental science or forestry with an interest in statistics, GIS and modelling, OR degree in mathematics, statistics, geomatics or informatics, with an interest in their environmental applications in a context of climate change.

Preferred start date: Summer or Fall 2020

Project collaborators: Yves Bergeron (UQAT), Mathieu Bouchard (MFFP), Louis De Grandpré (SCF), Matthew Duveneck (Harvard), Élise Filotas (TÉLUQ), Anouschka Hof (Wageningen), Hubert Morin (UQAC), Pierre Therrien (MFFP).

Are you ready to begin your Master’s on this fascinating topic? Send your CV, a cover letter, a transcript and contact information for two references to Philippe Marchand (philippe.marchand@uqat.ca) and Miguel Montoro Girona (miguel.montoro@uqat.ca). Review of applications will start on January 20, 2020 and continue until the position is filled. A professional adventure in the great boreal forest of Abitibi awaits you!

Links :

Abitibi-Témiscamingue Tourism : https://www.abitibi-temiscamingue-tourism.org/

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Postdoctoral position: Climate change, fire behavior, plant physiology

The Physiological Ecology Lab at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC, Canada (PI Sean Michaletz; www.michaletzlab.org) is recruiting a postdoctoral researcher to study fire behavior and its effects on plant physiology and forest dynamics.

The postdoc will help develop, test, and refine a next-generation modeling framework for predicting climate change effects on plant responses to multiple interacting disturbances.  This includes extending current trait-based models for fire and drought effects on whole-plant function, and implementing these into the physics-based FIRETEC coupled fire-atmosphere model and a coupled surface-subsurface hydrology model.  The modeling framework will be tested and refined using experimental data collected at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, USA.  The postdoc will be based at the University of British Columbia, but will work closely with collaborators Adam Atchley, Rod Linn, and the Applied Terrestrial, Energy and Atmospheric Modeling Team (bit.ly/2DBhPQc) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA.  The position is funded through SERDP (DOD, EPA, DOE).  We encourage applicants who can work across disciplines and combine mathematical models with data to study links between climate change, disturbances, whole-plant physiology, and forest ecosystem processes.

Funding is available for at least 3 years at a competitive salary that is commensurate with qualifications and experience.  Additional support is available for conference and fieldwork travel.  Start date is February 2020 but may be flexible.  Information on benefits is available at https://goo.gl/PDZX5p.  The lab strongly supports positive work-life balance for people in all stages of their careers.

Required skills include experience combining process-based models with field data in an Earth system, geoscience, or ecophysiology context.  Desired skills include experience with field work, knowledge of fire ecology, hydrology, and plant physiology, domain modeling and code development using programming languages such as Fortran or C++, high performance and parallel computing, and numerical simulation models (computational fluid dynamics, heat transfer, ecohydrology, forest dynamics).  Candidates must exhibit effective written and oral communication skills, have demonstrated ability to publish peer-reviewed papers, and have a Ph.D. pending or obtained within the last five years.  The multidisciplinary and collaborative nature of the project also requires willingness to work on a team.

To apply, please send a CV, a one page statement explaining why the position best matches your career goals, a recent publication, and names and contact information for three references to Sean Michaletz at sean.michaletz@ubc.ca.  The application deadline is January 1st 2020, but review will begin when applications are received and continue until the position is filled.  Please feel free to contact Sean Michaletz at any time with questions or to discuss projects.

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence.  An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged.  We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Metis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.

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PhD/MSc on the assembly of ecological networks along abiotic gradients (Montreal: Canada). Application deadline: February 1st, 2020.

Our lab is looking for graduate students to work on the assembly of ecological networks along environmental gradients (http://jeanphilippelessard.com/). We aim to use newly developed theoretical and analytical models using functional traits to infer ecological processes underlying the structure of interaction networks. We further aim to assess how the relative influence of such processes shaping resource-consumer networks vary along broad-scale environmental gradients. The selected students will have the freedom to develop her/his own project under this topic, and will have the opportunity to use existing empirical datasets and generate new ones. Our lab is currently working on hostparasite interactions in dragonflies along temperature gradients, plant-root microbe interactions in alpine ecosystems and plant-frugivore interactions at the global scale.

Potential applicants interested in these projects should have a good knowledge of network and trait-based ecology concepts and methods, strong analytical skills in R or other programing language, and the ability to handle large datasets. Prior experience conducting fieldwork and/or is an important asset for projects requiring new data acquisition. Prior knowledge of plants and/or insects and/or microbes is an asset.

Expected starting date is August 2020, but could be as early as May 2020. The position includes funding for stipend and research activities, but students that are competitive for external funding will have priority. Concordia University also offers entrance fellowship for students with strong academic and/or research experience record. Funded positions involve some teaching in the Department of Biology at Concordia University. Selected applicant(s) is/are expected to apply for external funding, participate in regular lab meetings, attend departmental seminars, publish results in peer-reviewed journals and present their research in national and international meetings. Demonstrated experience publishing in peer-reviewed journals is a must.

Applicants should email Dr. Jean-Philippe Lessard (jp.lessard@concordia.ca). This email should include: (i) 3-4 paragraphs describing research interests, relevant past experiences, and fit for the position (ii) an updated CV, and (iii) all unofficial transcripts pertaining to your previous or ongoing studies. Complete applications must be received by the school of graduate studies (http://www.concordia.ca/admissions/graduate.html) by February 1st, 2020. Applicants from minorities and/or Latin countries are encouraged to apply.

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PhD and MSc Position available: Development of a program for captive breeding and reintroduction of the Chorus Frog

The Chorus Frog is at risk in some areas, leading to the development of a recovery strategy for this species. As part of a university, government and public collaboration, we offer a graduate student position (PhD/MSc; uOttawa). The student will be co-supervised by Vance Trudeau (University of Ottawa; captive breeding) and Marc Mazerolle (Université Laval; reintroduction). We are looking for a dynamic and independent candidate to seize this unique research opportunity. A willingness to work with government partners and NGOs is an advantage. The projects are funded, including a scholarship and the position is available immediately.. Please send a letter of motivation (maximum 1 page in English or French), accompanied by your CV, an unofficial university transcript and the names of three potential references as soon as possible to Vance Trudeau (trudeauv@uottawa.ca).
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Graduate student positions in evolutionary ecology: wildfire and amphibian range limits

The Lee-Yaw lab at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta Canada is looking to recruit 1-2 graduate students to work on the evolutionary ecology of range limits.

Current, priority projects in the lab are focused on the long-toed salamander and include:

1) Wildfire effects on genetic diversity and population connectivity

The frequency and severity of wildfires are increasing around the world, making it imperative to understand the effects of these events on wildlife populations and species of conservation concern in particular. In collaboration with Parks Canada, the Lee-Yaw lab is investigating the effects of the 2017 Kenow Wildfire on long-toed salamanders in Waterton Lakes National Park. Long-toed salamanders occur at the edge of their range in Alberta where they are considered a species of Special Concern. The Kenow Wildfire was a severe disturbance event affecting >40% of vegetated areas in the park including many of the breeding ponds used by this species. Taking advantage of pre- and post-fire samples from across the park, we will assess changes in genetic diversity and patterns of gene flow in response to the fire. This work includes opportunities for fieldwork in the stunning setting of Waterton Lakes National Park and surrounding areas of the Rocky Mountains. The project will involve molecular lab work and modelling landscape connectivity with GIS data. This project is best-suited for an MSc student, although could be extended to a PhD.  Applicants should have a background or coursework in evolution, population biology, and/or ecology. Molecular lab experience is a strong assets, as is field experience, familiarity with R, and/or experience working with GIS datasets.

For more information on this project, visit:  https://julleeyaw.weebly.com/wildfire-project.html

2) Genomic perspectives on range limits

I am seeking a motivated PhD student to collect and analyze genomic data (ddRADseq and/or transcriptome data) for the long-toed salamander. This species is found throughout the Pacific Northwest and is comprised of several, genetically distinct subspecies. The boundaries between subspecies afford an opportunity to study parapatric range limits involving hybridization while the species’ eastern range limits in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains represent an opportunity to study limits to adaptation and range limits along elevational gradients. Tissue samples from across the species’ range are available. A number of dissertation projects involving these samples are possible, including testing genetic explanations for range limits, examining hybrid zone dynamics and cytonuclear interactions, and testing biogeographic hypotheses of historical range dynamics. Prior experience in the molecular lab is essential and priority will be given to candidates who have experience with next-generation sequencing (library preparation and SNP calling). Protocol optimization and bioinformatics will be done in collaboration with other labs and may involve opportunities to travel. There is scope to pair the genomic data with other types of data (field or lab experiments, or GIS modelling) depending on the student’s interests and progress.

Other projects within the scope of my research program may be considered depending on funding.

General inquiries should be sent to Julie Lee-Yaw (julie.leeyaw@uleth.ca). Applications should be sent by December 20. Please use the subject line “Graduate Studies” and include 1) a brief statement of research interests, 2) relevant experience, 3) a current CV, 4) unofficial copies of academic transcripts, and 5) intended start data and whether you are seeking a MSc or PhD. U of L deadlines for applying to graduate school are February 1 (for a May start date) and May 1 (for fall start). All students are encouraged to apply for external funding.

The Lee-Yaw lab is committed to diversity and inclusion and welcomes applications from students with diverse backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences.

Additional Information:

Lee-Yaw Lab: https://julleeyaw.weebly.com/

U of L Biological Sciences: https://www.uleth.ca/artsci/biological-sciences

U of L Graduate Studies: https://www.uleth.ca/future-student/graduate-studies/

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PROFESSEUR RÉGULIER, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières

Département: Sciences de l’environnement
Discipline: Écologie des eaux douces

Fonctions: l’enseignement, la recherche, le service à la collectivité et la direction pédagogique

Exigences : Être titulaire d’un doctorat (Ph. D.) en biologie ou discipline connexe avec spécialisation en écologie des poissons.

Expérience :

L’écologie des eaux douces est une discipline au cœur de la formation disciplinaire en Sciences biologiques et écologiques (BSc) et en Sciences de l’environnement (MSc, PhD) de l’Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR). Plusieurs cours du baccalauréat s’appuient sur les connaissances actuelles en biologie et écologie des poissons : Écologie des eaux douces, Zoologie des vertébrés, Cours terrain en écologie lacustre et fluviale, Dynamique des populations exploitées et Biologie des poissons. En raison de la forte demande du milieu socio-économique, tant régional que national, plusieurs projets de recherche aux deuxième et troisième cycles nécessitent une expertise en écologie des eaux douces et, plus spécifiquement, en écologie des poissons.

La recherche en écologie des eaux douces jouit d’une longue tradition à l’UQTR, qui s’est enracinée avec la création du Centre de recherche sur les interactions bassins versants-écosystèmes aquatiques (RIVE). Le professeur en écologie des eaux douces sera appelé à développer des collaborations avec les membres du RIVE. Le centre de recherche compte actuellement une cinquantaine d’étudiants aux trois cycles d’étude, 11 professeurs membres réguliers et 5 membres associés du Département des sciences de l’environnement. Le RIVE coordonne l’utilisation de trois infrastructures majeures d’enseignement et de recherche : deux laboratoires humides à la fine pointe, le navire de recherche Lampsilis, ainsi que le Laboratoire d’analyse en écologie aquatique et sédimentologie. Le professeur en écologie des eaux douces contribuera aussi à animer et mettre en valeur ces infrastructures stratégiques pour l’institution.

On attend du professeur en écologie des eaux douces, avec spécialisation en écologie des poissons, qu’il dirige un programme de recherche subventionné à l’externe. Avec plus d’un million de lacs, d’innombrables rivières et un des grands fleuves du monde, les vastes ressources d’eau douce du Québec font partie de son développement socio-économique. L’UQTR est ainsi positionnée stratégiquement en tant que pôle d’enseignement et de recherche en écologie des eaux douce au Canada et à l’international.

CLIQUEZ ICI pour plus d’information et pour postuler.

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Graduate student positions, University of Toronto Scarborough

The Wang lab in the Department of Biological Sciences at University of Toronto Scarborough is looking for graduate students interested in genomics and symbiosis between microbial fungi and insects to start in Fall 2020. Interested applicants should apply through the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology graduate program at University of Toronto (deadline Jan. 7th, 2020).

Major efforts in the lab include: 1) assembling high-quality fungal genomes using long-read sequencing data, 2) developing phylogenomic markers for molecular systematics of early-diverging fungi, 3) investigating population genomic structure of insect-associated fungi, and 4) examining experimental evolution and gene expression preference of insect gut-dwelling fungi. We use combined approaches in field collection, host-microbe interactions, and bioinformatics. For additional information on our research activities, please check our recent papers at http://individual.utoronto.ca/yanwang/publications.html. The Wang lab is strongly committed to equity, diversity, and inclusion in the workplace.

Qualifications:

Applicants should have research interests and relevant experience in either Mycology, Entomology, or Bioinformatics. A Master of Science degree is generally eligible for entrance into our Ph.D. program. A bachelor’s degree in either Biology or Science is required before Fall 2020 for the M.Sc. or direct-entry Ph.D. programs. Those with experience of phylogenomics, comparative transcriptomics, gene editing, or molecular biology are highly encouraged. More details can be found at http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/grad/prosp.htm.

For inquiries, please contact Dr. Yan Wang at yanxw.wang@utoronto.ca. Please include your most recent CV and a brief research statement (less than 1 page) summarizing your research interests and experience. Further information can also be found at http://individual.utoronto.ca/yanwang/contact.html.

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from racialized persons / persons of colour, women, Indigenous / Aboriginal People of North America, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ persons, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.

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Graduate student positions in plant evolutionary ecology at the University of Guelph

I am looking for graduate students (MS or PhD) interested in studying the effect of pollinator declines on floral evolution in native wildflowers.

For more information on my lab, check out:

www.christinamariecaruso.com

Students will have considerable freedom to develop their projects, and could start in either Fall 2020 or Winter 2021.

Interested candidates should email me at carusoc@uoguelph.ca. Please include a statement of interest, CV, and transcript (unofficial is fine). Because of funding restrictions, preference will be given to candidates who are Canadian citizens or landed immigrants.

Christina M. (Chris) Caruso
Associate Professor
Department of Integrative Biology
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada

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Impact Chair Position in Ocean Ecosystem Change and Conservation Department of Biology, University of Victoria

The Department of Biology at the University of Victoria invites candidates to apply for a UVic Impact Chair appointment in the area of ocean ecosystem change and conservation with an expected start date of September 2020.  UVic Impact Chairs are intended for exceptional researchers acknowledged as world leaders in their field, with recognized success in research-inspired teaching and fostering collaborative and interdisciplinary research.  The successful candidate will hold a faculty appointment at the rank of Associate Professor with tenure, or Professor with tenure. Rank will be determined in accordance with the department’s Standard and the provisions of the Collective Agreement. The term of the UVic Impact Chair is five years and the holder will receive up to $50,000 annually to support research, pedagogy or partnerships, as applicable. This appointment opportunity is limited to external candidates.

We seek candidates who bring an innovative perspective to understanding how marine organisms and/or ecosystems respond to human-forced change, and who use this understanding to provide guidance for marine protection and resource management efforts. Specific areas of focus could include (but are not limited to) physiology, ecology, or conservation biology.

Candidates who are collaborative, and who will bolster existing scientific strengths in marine science across the University, are especially encouraged to apply. The Chair appointment will be in the Department of Biology but is intended to be cross-listed with a Department or School in the Faculty of Social Sciences (e.g. Environmental Studies or Geography) to facilitate graduate student supervision in both areas. In addition, the Chair will demonstrate a commitment to convening productive research and teaching alliances between the academic units and Ocean Networks Canada. Other collaborative opportunities at UVic include the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, and the Genome BC Proteomics Centre.

Qualifications: Candidates must have a Ph.D. and an established, externally funded, independent and original research program with a demonstrated commitment to excellence in research and teaching. The successful candidate will teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels, share in the administrative responsibilities of the department, and play an active role in the advising and supervision of graduate and undergraduate students. The following will be considered assets: a research record that reflects interdisciplinarity or productive collaborations among researchers from biology and related marine science disciplines; a record of teaching or active student mentorship, recognizing the diversity of student experiences; experience in knowledge mobilization beyond the university; and experience in and commitment to respectful and collegial relationships. Rank and salary will be competitive and commensurate with the qualifications of the candidate.

To Apply: Candidates must submit a single PDF document that includes a cover letter outlining how the candidate meets the requirements of the position, a CV, and a 2-page description of their proposed research program (including how it addresses the UVic Strategic Framework priority to promote sustainable futures). Candidates must also provide a 2-page statement on teaching experience and teaching philosophy, including how they will support diversity and inclusiveness in teaching and research. Candidates must also include the names and contact information for three referees.

The application document should be emailed with the subject “Impact Chair” to: Chantal Laliberté (biology@uvic.ca). For questions regarding the position please contact Dr. Barbara Hawkins, Chair of the Department of Biology via email (biochair@uvic.ca) or phone (250-721-7091). Information about the Department of Biology can be found here: www.uvic.ca/science/biology.

Review of applications will begin on January 6, 2020.

The University: The University of Victoria is consistently ranked in the top tier of Canada’s research-intensive universities. Vital impact drives the UVic sense of purpose. As an internationally renowned teaching and research hub, we tackle essential issues that matter to people, places and the planet. Situated in the Pacific Rim, our location breeds a profound passion for exploration. Defined by its edges, this extraordinary environment inspires us to defy boundaries, discover, and innovate in exciting ways. It’s different here, naturally and by design. We live, learn, work and explore on the edge of what’s next—for our planet and its peoples. Our commitment to research-inspired dynamic learning and vital impact make this Canada’s most extraordinary environment for discovery and innovation. Experience the edge of possibilities for yourself.

UVic is committed to upholding the values of equity, diversity, and inclusion in our living, learning and work environments. In pursuit of our values, we seek members who will work respectfully and constructively with differences and across levels of power. We actively encourage applications from members of groups experiencing barriers to equity. Read our full equity statement here.

The University acknowledges the potential impact that career interruptions can have on a candidate’s record of research achievement. We encourage applicants to explain in their application the impact that career interruptions have had on their record.

Persons with disabilities, who anticipate needing accommodation for any part of the application and hiring process, may contact Faculty Relations and Academic Administration in the Office of the VP Academic and Provost at FRrecruit@uvic.ca. Any personal information provided will be maintained in confidence.

Faculty and Librarians at the University of Victoria are governed by the provisions of the Collective Agreement. Members are represented by the University of Victoria Faculty Association (www.uvicfa.ca).

Please note that reference and background checks, including credential and degree verification, may be undertaken as part of this recruitment process.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. Please indicate in your application package if you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident.

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