Graduate student positions in plant evolutionary ecology at the University of Guelph

I am looking for graduate students (MS or PhD) interested in studying (1) the evolution and maintenance of gynodioecy (a breeding system where female and hermaphroditic plants coexist) or (2) the effect of pollinator declines on floral evolution in native wildflowers.

For more information on these projects and my lab, check out:

www.christinamariecaruso.com

Students will have considerable freedom to develop their projects, and could start in either Fall 2019 or Winter 2020.

Interested candidates should email me at carusoc@uoguelph.ca. Please include a statement of interest, CV, and transcript (unofficial is fine). Because of funding restrictions, preference will be given to candidates who are Canadian citizens or landed immigrants.

Christina M. (Chris) Caruso
Associate Professor
Department of Integrative Biology
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada

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Assistant Professor – Mycology – # 1803891. Application deadline: November 12, 2018.

The Department of Biology at the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) invites applications for a tenure-stream appointment in Mycology, at the rank of Assistant Professor, commencing July 1, 2019.

We are searching for an outstanding scientist who addresses fundamental questions in fungal biology. The department is particularly interested in an individual who would bring complementary research, teaching and technical expertise. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Ecology and Evolution
  • Systematics, speciation, biodiversity
  • Fungal metabolism and biochemistry
  • Population genetics

Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Biology or closely related field, post-doctoral experience, and demonstrated excellence in research and teaching.

Evidence of excellence in research will be demonstrated by publications in top ranked, peer reviewed and field relevant academic journals, presentations at significant conferences, awards and accolades, and strong endorsements by referees of top international stature. Evidence of excellence in research will be demonstrated by publications in top ranked, peer reviewed and field relevant academic journals, presentations at significant conferences, awards and accolades, and strong endorsements by referees of top international stature. The candidate must also demonstrate excellence in teaching. This can be accomplished through strong endorsements from referees and a teaching portfolio, including a coherent statement of teaching philosophy, teaching accomplishments, and excellent course evaluations, or demonstrated excellent performance in other teaching related activities, including performance as a teaching assistant, student mentorship, experience leading successful workshops or seminars, or excellent conference posters or presentations.

The successful applicant is expected to develop and maintain an active, independent, innovative and externally funded program of research and to contribute to the education and training of undergraduate and graduate students in the Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga. This individual will also be appointed to the tri-campus graduate Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Toronto. For more information on the Department of Biology please visit our webpage
at www.utm.utoronto.ca/biology.Information on the graduate unit can be found at www.eeb.utoronto.ca.

The University of Toronto Mississauga and its affiliated institutions offer a stimulating and supportive environment with a variety of facilities and a highly interactive community of researchers. We seek applications from individuals whose research program would complement existing departmental research strengths. Excellent opportunities exist for collaboration within the Department of Biology, with other departments at UTM, as well as with faculty at the St. George and Scarborough campuses of the University of Toronto.

Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

All qualified applicants are invited to apply online by clicking the link below. Applications must include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a statement outlining current and future research interests, three representative publications, and the teaching portfolio to include a statement on teaching philosophy and experience, course evaluations, teaching accomplishments, or evidence of other teaching related activities. Submission guidelines can be found at: http://uoft.me/how-to-apply. We recommend combining attached documents into one or two files in PDF/MS Word files in the following format:

1) Letter, CV, research statement, and teaching portfolio
2) Publications

Applicants should arrange for three signed letters of reference from individuals familiar with the candidate’s research and teaching to be sent directly to: Dr. Joel Levine, Chair, Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, by email (on letterhead, signed and scanned) to: biology.utm@utoronto.ca.

If you have any questions regarding this position please contact Prof. Joel Levine at biology.utm@utoronto.ca.

Closing date for submissions is November 12, 2018 11:59 pm EST.

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from racialized persons / persons of colour, women, Indigenous / Aboriginal People of North America, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ persons, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.

As part of your application, you will be asked to complete a brief Diversity Survey. This survey is voluntary. Any information directly related to you is confidential and cannot be accessed by search committees or human resources staff. Results will be aggregated for institutional planning purposes. For more information, please see http://uoft.me/UP.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

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Bourse de maîtrise en écologie – Projet de recherche sur les services écosystémiques fournis par les infrastructures vertes en milieu urbain et périurbain. Date limite: 9 octobre 2018.

L’Institut des sciences de la forêt tempérée est à la recherche d’un étudiant pour entreprendre un projet de recherche en écologie urbaine et en écohydrologie. L’étudiant mènera une campagne de collecte de données sur le terrain afin de caractériser et cartographier les services écosystémiques des îlots forestiers en Outaouais (Québec, Canada).

L’étudiant évoluera dans l’environnement stimulant de l’Institut des sciences de la forêt tempérée et du Centre d’étude de la forêt. Le ou la candidat(e) intéressé(e) s’inscrira au programme de maîtrise en biologie de l’Université du Québec en Outaouais (UQO).

Exigences : Le ou la candidat(e) doit avoir complété un baccalauréat ou l’équivalent en sciences biologiques, en foresterie, en sciences environnementales ou dans une discipline connexe. Il ou elle doit être disponible pour travailler sur le terrain et avoir une bonne capacité de travailler en équipe et de façon autonome.

Début des études : hiver 2019

Bourse : $ 15,000/an pour 2 ans

Supervision : Sylvain Delagrange (UQO-ISFORT) et Audrey Maheu (UQO-ISFORT)

Pour plus d’information : sylvain.delagrange@uqo.ca ou audrey.maheu@uqo.ca

Pour soumettre une candidature, veuillez envoyer, au plus tard le 9 octobre 2018, une lettre de motivation, un CV, un relevé de note à jour et le nom et les coordonnées de deux références aux adresses électroniques mentionnées ci-dessus.

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Ph.D. IN ECOLOGY AND LIFE HISTORY OF WILD HORSES ON SABLE ISLAND. Application deadline: Oct 25, 2018.

Location: University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.

Supervisors: Dr. Philip McLoughlin, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. http://mcloughlinlab.ca/lab

Deadline to Apply: Contact by Oct 25, 2018

Salary: Dependent on internal Scholarship (U of S Dean’s Scholarship Opportunity).

Start date: January 1st 2019 or May 1st 2019 (negotiable).

Project: We are looking to recruit a PhD student to contribute to our long-term, individual-based study of feral horses on Sable Island (Nova Scotia, Canada) initiated in 2007. There are several opportunities for the student to develop exciting thesis chapters and papers, including those based on linking horse survival and reproduction to grasslands enriched by sea-to-land nutrient transfers by seals; developing a fuller understanding of the role of horses in nutrient flows on the island with consequences for island biogeography (including theory); understanding the critical role of density and intraspecific density-dependent processes in population dynamics (from an individual-based perspective); and other fundamental questions of population ecology, life history, behaviour and sociobiology, parasitism, conservation, and evolution. We are particularly looking for mature M.Sc. students that are interested in developing a Ph.D. program that will contribute to and make use of and lead the archiving of the long-term data set the lab is collecting on the life histories of the horses on the island (>1000 life histories in the database, which is now one of the largest for a large vertebrate in the world). Sample sizes are large, with ~500 horses alive on the island as at Aug 2018. Next summer will be the 12th year of data collection, which includes summer censusing and identification of all individuals on the island using digital photography, and documentation of individual life histories with the goal of constructing whole-island pedigrees (the latter, and all molecular ecology questions, are being addressed by collaborator Dr. Jocelyn Poissant, at the University of Calgary). The student’s overall program will be a collaborative project benefiting from close interaction with the Poissant lab, with other opportunities to collaborate on campus or at other universities (e.g., Alastair Wilson lab at Exeter).

The student will spend up to 2 months on Sable Island each summer for fieldwork. Daily tasks, shared by the entire research team, will include walking censuses and photography of horses, collection of samples, laboratory work, identification of individuals from digital photographs, and database management. Students visiting Sable Island must work well in teams, deal well with life in a remote research station, be able to travel by small airplane, fishing trawler, helicopter, or frigate, and be reasonably fit as walking censuses require lots of hiking. Courses on first aid and driving all-terrain vehicles will be provided prior to fieldwork.

While all applications are welcomed, this position is scholarship-dependent; hence, preference will be given to Canadians who are competitive for a U of S Dean’s Scholarship and/or an NSERC scholarship. This will require M.Sc. publications and exceptionally good grades (GPA > 3.8) and a track record of past awards.

To apply send an email titled SABLE ISLAND PHD 2018 to philip.mcloughlin@usask.ca:

  • A short summary of research interests
  • Copies of your publications and description of role in these papers
  • A current CV
  • PDFs of undergraduate and graduate transcripts
  • The names and email addresses of 2 or 3 potential references
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Postdoctoral Scholar in Biological Anthropology/ Medical Genetics. Application deadline: 1 November 2018.

Department: Anthropology and Archaeology; Medical Genetics
Institution: University of Calgary
Address: 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, Canada
Job type: Postdoc
Apply by: 1 November 2018
Application email: amanda.melin@ucalgary.ca; use subject line “EHPDS application”.

Applications are invited for a two-year postdoctoral scholar position at the University of Calgary, Canada, that will span the Department of Anthropology & Archaeology, and the Department of Medical Genetics. Funding for this position is provided by the University of Calgary’s Eyes High Strategy in support of recruiting exceptional postdoctoral scholars.

The postdoctoral scholar will spearhead a new line of collaborative research uniting the University of Calgary (Amanda Melin), New York University (James Higham), and the University of Tokyo (Shoji Kawamura). This research will address the genetic underpinnings of variation in perceptual abilities of non-human primates, including cone ratios, colour vision, acuity, and age-related changes in vision, the retina, lens, and other ocular tissues as well as their evolutionary and biomedical significance. Analyses will capitalize on a large tissue bank and integrate genomics, transcriptomics, and morphology. The goal is to probe both evolutionary and evolutionarily-informed biomedical questions about the effects of age, sex, and genotype on retinal morphology, gene expression, and disease phenotypes.

Minimum requirements of applicants, by the time of appointment, are a Ph.D. degree in biological anthropology, biology, genetics/genomics, or a related field. Graduates (received PhD) from the University of Calgary are not eligible. The appointment must commence within five years of the PhD degree being awarded. Applicants must have relevant experience in analysis of genomic datasets, and demonstrate a strong record of original research and scholarship. Ideal applicants will also have experience handling biological tissues, DNA / RNA extraction, or training in anatomy, especially related to ocular morphology.

The start date for the position is negotiable but must begin in 2019. The postdoctoral scholar will receive $55 000 CAD in salary annually, as well as health benefits. Interested applicants should email application materials (letter of application summarizing interests, skills and goals, CV, and contact information for 3 referees) to Amanda Melin (amanda.melin@ucalgary.ca), subject line “EHPDS application”.

The University of Calgary is an Equal Opportunity Employer. There are no citizenship requirements. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, genetic information, or disability or any other legally protected basis.

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MSc opportunity, rattlesnake road-ecology work in British Columbia

We anticipate an opening for an MSc student continuing work on the road-ecology of a population of Western Rattlesnakes in the Okanagan valley of British Columbia.   We are looking for someone with a genuine, demonstrated interest in animal ecology, rather than solely a fascination with snakes.   We anticipate an early-April start date in the field, although there likely will  be opportunity to do some advanced work (with pay) prior to the spring emergence of snakes.

Inquiries and/or statements of interest from prospective students should be directed to Karl Larsen at Thompson Rivers University.   Following that, an unofficial copy of transcripts along with a Cv (providing references) will be needed.

Karl W. Larsen    klarsen@tru.ca
Professor, wildlife ecology & management
Department of Natural Resource Sciences
Thompson Rivers University

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Post-doctoral position, University of Toronto Scarborough

The Weir lab at the University of Toronto Scarborough is looking for a Post-doctoral Researcher to work on avian genomics projects. The lab is developing several genomic-based study systems and has active projects addressing speciation dynamics from a number of Canadian and Amazonian avian hybrid zones, conservation genomics of kiwi, and the genomics of hybrid speciation to list a few. A key focus of the lab is using comparative genomic data to address broad-scale questions in ecology, evolution, and conservation. The successful candidate will work within one of these study systems but will be given freedom to develop their own research questions.

Qualifications: Applicants must have completed a PhD in Evolution, Bioinformatics, Genomics or related discipline within the preceding two years. The applicant should be well versed in coding, working with vertebrate genomic data including familiarity with commonly used pipelines for processing and analysing whole-genome data or reduced genome-datasets.

Salary: $48,000 (plus benefits)

Duration: 2 years

Start Date: Flexible between the dates of March 1 to December 1, 2019.

How to Apply: Please send a curriculum vitae, one-page statement of research skills and interests and copies of two publications to Jason Weir (jason.weir@utoronto.ca) before November 1. Short-listed candidates will be provided with instructions on how to apply for a University of Toronto Scarborough Postdoctoral Fellowship. Eight such fellowships are awarded annually across the campus.

Example genomic publications from the Weir Lab (PDF’s available at https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/~jweir):

  1. Barrera-Guzman, A. O., A. Aleixo, M. D. Shawkey, J. T. Weir. 2018. Hybrid speciation leads to novel male secondary sexual ornamentation of an Amazonian bird. PNAS. 115: E218-E225.
  2. Weir, J. W., O. Haddrath, H. A. Robertson, R. M. Colbourne, A. J. Baker. 2016. Explosive ice age diversification in kiwi. PNAS. 113: E5580-E5587.
  3. Pulido-Santacruz, P, A. Aleixo, J. T. Weir. 2018. Morphologically cryptic Amazonian bird species pairs exhibit strong post-zygotic reproductive isolation. Proc. R. Soc. B 285: 20172081

 

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Job offer: research assistants on an ecosystem monitoring project in the Arctic. Application deadline: October 15th, 2018.

The K.-C.-Irving Research Chair in Environmental Sciences and Sustainable Development is seeking applicants for field assistant positions on an ongoing ecosystem monitoring project on Igloolik Island (Nunavut). This project aims at monitoring populations of nesting birds and lemmings, as well as plants communities in this High-Arctic region of Canada. In parallel to this ecosystem monitoring, we also investigate the decline in shorebird populations in the Arctic. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the decline of certain shorebirds species, we study their migratory patterns and their demography in collaboration with researchers working at a circumpolar scale. Fieldwork in Igloolik will be conducted from June 5th to July 31st, 2019, and the contract could include tasks in May and August in Moncton. This summer job could lead to Master’s projects for interested candidates. If you are interested by a Master’s project, thanks to indicate that in the application form.

Fieldwork duties:

  • Monitoring birds nests
  • Trapping shorebirds and lemmings
  • Conducting plant survey
  • Managing samples

Supervision: Marie-Andrée Giroux (Université de Moncton)

Skills required:

    • Team spirit and sense of initiative
    • Good physical condition
    • Fieldwork and camping experience (in remote location or with limited living accommodations would be an asset)
    • Scientific rigour (data collection and sample management)
    • Good academic achievements would be an asset
    • To have completed 1 semester of an undergraduate program in biology (or similar field)

When and how to apply?

Thank you for applying by filling the online application form (https://goo.gl/forms/3QVM08owjUAffDuf2) and by sending the files described below by email (ines.khedhri@umoncton.ca) before October 15th, 2018. To complete the application, you will need the contact information for two references. The files to submit are the electronic version of your CV (2 pages maximum) and of your university transcripts (non-official versions are accepted). Thanks to use the following format for naming files: “First Name”_”Last Name”_”CV or Transcript”. Pre-selected candidates should be available for an interview between October 17th and 22nd, 2018.

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GRADUATE POSITIONS IN INVASION ECOLOGY

Peter M. Kotanen
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto Mississauga

I am on sabbatical from July 2018 – June 2019, but will be recruiting several Ph.D. and M.Sc. students to start when I return. My lab studies the ecology of plants and their natural enemies (herbivores and pathogens) in Ontario and elsewhere. Recent work has centred on the effects of insects and soil pathogens on non-native species, and whether damage depends on latitude, population isolation, and other factors. I’m also planning a new project studying factors setting northern range limits of invaders. Information on our research can be found at my home page: www.utm.utoronto.ca/~w3pkota.

We are a thriving department at a leading research institution, with excellent resources and many opportunities for interaction and collaboration. All graduate students are guaranteed a stable minimum income, currently $26,750 from a variety of sources, which provides for tuition (ca. $8500) and living expenses ($18,250). Additional support is available for research and conference travel. Information on application procedures and our tri-campus graduate program can be found at http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/grad.htm. We will be accepting new applications beginning in November 2018, and will begin to review them in January 2019 for start dates in the summer or fall of 2019. Interested students should first contact me via e-mail: peter.kotanen@utoronto.ca.

Some recent publications: 

  • Nunes & Kotanen (2018) Does local isolation allow an invasive thistle to escape enemy pressure? Oecologia 188: 139-147.
  • Nunes & Kotanen (2018) Comparative impacts of aboveground and belowground enemies on an invasive thistle. Ecology and Evolution 8: 1430-1440.
  • Fitzpatrick, Gehant, Kotanen, & Johnson (2017) Phylogenetic relatedness, phenotypic similarity, and plant-soil feedbacks. Journal of Ecology 105: 786-800.
  • Anstett, Nunes, Baskett, & Kotanen (2016) Sources of controversy surrounding latitudinal patterns in herbivory and defence. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 10: 789-802.
  • Kambo & Kotanen (2014) Latitudinal trends in herbivory and performance of an invasive species, common burdock (Arctium minus). Biological Invasions 16: 101-112.

Peter M. Kotanen
Dept. of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto Mississauga
3359 Mississauga Road
Mississauga, ON, L5L 1C6 CANADA
tel: 905-828-5365; fax: 905-828-3792
e-mail: peter.kotanen@utoronto.ca
www.utm.utoronto.ca/~w3pkota

[This notice may be downloaded at http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/~w3pkota/students_wanted_2018.pdf]

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Ph.D. student needed to study the resilience of trees to drought in the temperate forest

Description:

The selected student will (1) validate the tolerance of different species to drought in stands with different structures and compositions using a dendrochronological approach that investigates responses during the numerous episodes of droughts in recent years and 2) evaluate water harvesting strategies and climate variables that control transpiration in the dominant commercial species in southern Quebec using water tracing and flow measurement techniques.

The student will become a member of the Center for Forest Research (CFR) and will benefit from services in statistics, databases, GIS, etc. The project will be conducted in collaboration with the regional hardwoods forestry agency (mostly on private forest lands), Ouranos (a climate change consortium)and the Ministry of forests, wildlife and parks. The student will be supervised by Professors Daniel Kneeshaw (UQAM) and Daniel Houle (MFFP-Ouranos). The latter will also be the supervisor of the MITACS internship at Ouranos.

Requirements: The candidate must have completed a master’s degree in forestry, biology or another relevant discipline and must have an excellent academic record, good writing skills and good analytical skills. Knowledge in ecophysiology and experience in database management are assets.

Treatment: $ 20 – 21,000 / year or more at the doctoral level (funded by a MITACS project), potential to increase salary through TA ship as well, possibility of recruitment scholarship, internal univerity top-up scholarships. A waiver of foreign student fees for foreign students will also be applied

Duration: 3 years

For more information or to apply:

Daniel Houle: Daniel.Houle@mffp.gouv.qc.ca

Daniel Kneeshaw: kneeshaw.daniel@uqam.ca

 

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