CSEE 2018 student award winners

Congratulations to the CSEE 2018 award winners:

First place oral ($525) – Jalina Bielaska Da Silva. Genetic mechanisms of aggressive sperm-mediated gametic isolation in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

Second place oral ($425) – Quentin Kerr. Temporal stability of genomic differentiation between seasonal spawning components in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus).

Third place oral ($300) – Frances Stewart. Protected area networks are only as valuable as the working landscapes they conserve.

First place poster ($525) – Samuel Deakin. Spatial genetic population structure of Alberta’s bighorn sheep.

Second place poster ($425) – Katie Birchard. Circadian gene variation with latitude and breeding season in allochronic populations of two pelagic seabird species complexes.

Third place poster ($300) – Jamie Bain. The effects of agricultural intensity on stream metabolism.

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2018 EARLY CAREER AWARDS

The CSEE Early Career Awards (ECA) recognize outstanding accomplishments and promising future research potential in ecology and evolution by scientists early in their careers. The evaluation committee was extremely impressed with the overall quality of applicants for the 2018 awards, so the process was both gratifying and difficult. This year’s recipients of the ECA were Stephen de Lisle (Postdoctoral Scholar, Lund University; Ph.D. University of Toronto) and Patrick Thompson (Postdoctoral Fellow, University of British Columbia; Ph.D. McGill University). Congratulations to Stephen and Patrick!

Stephen de Lisle

Postdoctoral Scholar (Lund University); Ph.D. University of Toronto

stephen-de-lisleStephen is an evolutionary ecologist interested in understanding how ecological processes drive evolutionary change within and between species. In particular, his research focuses on organisms with separate sexes to understand how and why selection and adaptation differ between males and females of the same species, and how the resulting evolution of sex differences influences both ecological communities and the dynamics of deep-time macroevolutionary diversification. In order to connect process and pattern across these disparate timescales, his research uses a wide range of approaches including ecological field experiments and surveys of wild populations, evolutionary quantitative genetics, and phylogenetic comparative methods.

Patrick Thompson

Postdoctoral Fellow (University of British Columbia); Ph.D. McGill University

patrick-thompsonPatrick Thompson is a community ecologist who seeks to understand the processes that maintain biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in changing environments. His research integrates theory and empirical methods in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems to study how changing land scape connectivity, food-web interactions, and adaptation combine to shape current and future communities. By developing and testing theory on how these processes interactively affect how communities respond to environmental change, his work advances our understanding of how communities operate and seeks to inform strategies for preserving biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in the face of global change.

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Diversity and Excellence in Doctoral Research Awards 2018

Diversity and Excellence in Doctoral Research Award

The CSEE invites PhD candidates whom are at an advanced stage of their dissertation to apply for our Diversity and Excellence in Doctoral Research Award. Award winners will receive $500 and will have an opportunity to present their doctorial research in our special Graduate Student Award Symposium at the annual CSEE meeting.

Scope and Criteria

This award aims to showcase excellent student research from within the society. Successful applicants will have conducted high-quality research that addresses fundamental questions or is of an applied nature in the fields of ecology and evolution. In addition to demonstrated scholarship and merit, the selection committee aims to promote diversity in science (we encourage applicants to refer to the CSEE diversity statement published in the last bulletin), and to balance field of study and institutional representation. All eligible PhD students are encouraged to apply.

Eligibility

Applicants must be registered in a PhD program and a member of CSEE at the time of application. Applicants should be within their last year of study (about to submit or defend their thesis) but should not have completed their degree requirements by the time of application (recent degree holders should consider applying for the Early Career Award instead).  Successful applicants are expected to attend the CSEE meeting in Guelph in July and to present their work as part of the CSEE Graduate Student Awards Symposium (exemptions for parental reasons will be considered on an individual basis). Applicants from last year who were not selected for the award but still meet the eligibility criteria are encouraged to re-apply.

Materials

Applications should include the following sections in the following order:

1) Thesis Summary (500 words maximum): An overview of the different chapters of your thesis and how each contributes to the fields of ecology or evolution (subheadings for different thesis chapters are permitted)

2) Other Relevant Activities (250 words maximum): In this section describe any professional and extracurricular activities that demonstrate your communication and leadership skills.

3) Select Awards and Contributions (1 page maximum): Using three headings, highlight awards that you have received, talks or posters that you have given and papers published

4) Letter of support from your PhD advisor or a committee member. Letters should speak to the criteria listed above and should clearly state that the applicant is close to completion of their thesis.

Materials 1 through 3 should be submitted as a single word or pdf document with the filename  “<lastname>_CSEE_PhDaward” to cseestudent@gmail.com. The letter of support should be submitted directly from the referee to the same email address. The application deadline is April 20, 2018.

Other Important Information

Successful applicants will be scheduled to give a 30 minute talk in the Graduate Student Award Symposium and will not be able to give a separate talk or poster during the conference. Unsuccessful applicants are encouraged to give a regular talk or poster during the conference but are not automatically assigned a talk or poster slot. For this reason, all applicants should also apply to present at the meeting following the standard conference registration procedure and following the separate deadlines announced for the meeting (this includes indicating interest in being considered for the regular student talk/poster awards). The top five runners up will be acknowledged during the conference.

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Early Career Award 2018

Deadline for receipt of all application materials: 26 January 2018

Award Description: The CSEE Early Career Awards recognize outstanding accomplishments and promising future research potential in ecology and evolution by scientists early in their career. Awards will be given to two candidates each year. They consist of a 10-year membership to CSEE/SCEE, $500 cash award, up to $1000 allowance for travel and accommodation to attend the CSEE meeting in Guelph, ON, in July 2018, and an invitation to give a keynote lecture at the annual meeting.

Eligibility: Applicants must be active researchers in the field of ecology and evolutionary biology who received their doctorate within five years of the application deadline, not including time taken for parental leave (i.e., one year of parental leave extends the eligibility period to six years post-Ph.D.). Candidates need to be Canadian citizens, or landed immigrants, or have completed their PhD at a Canadian University, or be currently working at a Canadian University.

Application/Nomination Procedures: Candidates may apply directly or may be nominated.  Established researchers are encouraged to nominate outstanding young scientists.  Nominations must contain all of the following supporting materials in the stated order: (1) a curriculum vitae, (2) a summary of research accomplishments (maximum 2 pages), (3) a 2-page statement of research plans for the next 5 years, (4) three recent publications, (5) names and addresses of 3 referees (including the nominating scientist where applicable) who will provide supporting letters. The 3 letters of reference should be sent separately from the candidate’s nomination package. All nomination materials and reference letters must be sent as PDFs to the chair of the CSEE Awards committee, Mark Vellend (mark.vellend@usherbrooke.ca).

Time lines: The deadline for receipt of all materials including letters of reference is 26 January 2018. The recipients will be notified of the award in early March and they will receive their award at the following annual meeting.

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2017 Student Awards from Victoria

Student presentation awards

Sean Goodwin, Simon Fraser University – Reduced growth in wild juvenile sockeye salmon infected with sea lice

Shannon Meadley Dunphy, University of Toronto – Population genetics and invasion history of the invasive European fire ant, Myrmica rubra, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Kathryn Anderson, University of British Columbia – Calcified herbivore loss may  disproportionately drive responses to ocean acidification in natural communities

FACETS Interdisciplinary Research Award

Beverly McClenaghan, Trent University – DNA metabarcoding reveals the broad and flexible diet of a declining aerial insectivore

McGill Hendry Lab NSERC CREATE Poster Award

Katrina Kaur, University of Toronto -Do ant-plant mutualisms drive diversification in ants?

Best poster awards

Samuel Starko, University of British Columbia – Allometric scaling in kelps:
Size-dependent patterns, covariation, and the importance of habitat
Joseph Burant, University of Guelph – Exploratory behaviour in red knots: A tale of ontogeny
CSEE PhD Excellence and Diversity Award
Tess Grainger, University of Toronto – Multi-scale responses to warming in an experimental metacommunity

Tiago Simões, University of Alberta – Reptile phylogeny and the origin and early radiation of lepidosaurs

 Norah Brown, University of British Columbia – Altered competition under ocean acidification influences species but not community-level response to food supply

Isabelle Laforest-Lapointe, Université du Québec à Montréal -Leaf bacterial diversity mediates plant diversity-ecosystem function relationships

 Evelyn Jensen, University of British Columbia Okanagan- Looking through the bottleneck: Genomic analysis of historical and contemporary population genetic variation in the Pinzon
Island Galapagos tortoise
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2017 Early Career Awards

The CSEE Early Career Awards recognize outstanding accomplishments and promising future research potential in ecology and evolution by scientists early in their careers. We are delighted to announce that the recipients for the 2017 awards are Dr. Emily Darling, from the University of Toronto and the Wildlife Conservation Society, and Dr. Sean Anderson, from the University of Washington. We look forward to hearing their plenary talks at the CSEE meeting in Victoria.

Congratulations to both recipients, and hats off to all candidates for the very high calibre of their submissions.

Dr Emily Darlingedarling

Emily is a community ecologist and conservation biologist who is motivated to understand how human activities are altering coastal and marine ecosystems. Her research focuses on three interrelated themes: quantifying interactions between multiple stressors and the prevalence of ecological synergies, coral life histories and trajectories of community change on coral reefs, and managing marine ecosystems for resilience to climate change. Her work integrates multiple approaches, ranging from literature reviews, meta-analyses, and statistical analyses of long-term monitoring data, to quantitative field experiments and socio-economic surveys to understand the complex ecological dynamics of coastal systems.

 

sandersonDr Sean Anderson

Sean is a quantitative population biologist who links theory with data through statistical and simulation models to improve predictions about ecological systems and inform management and policy decisions. In particular, he is interested in how we can estimate population status with limited data and in the role of variance, risk, and extreme events in population dynamics. Because these problems are complex, a large part of his research involves method and software development and is often highly collaborative. His work spans across taxa (e.g. birds, moths, grizzly bears, sea cucumbers, salmon), ecosystems (marine, freshwater, terrestrial), methods (empirical, simulation, theoretical), spatial scale (regional, national, global), and time periods (modern, historical, paleontological).

 

 

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2016 Student awards from St. John’s

Student presentation awards

Oral presentation (tied first place):

Rebecca Batstone, University of Toronto – Root foraging and mutualism-stabilizing traits in the model legume Medicago truncatula

Kira Hoffman, University of Victoria – A human-driven and climate-influenced fire regime over the past seven centuries in a coastal temperate rainforest, British Columbia, Canada

Ruth Rivkin, University of Toronto Mississauga – The role of sexual system and latitude on insect herbivory rates in Sagittaria latifolia (Alismataceae)

New Phytologist Prize:

Kenneth Thompson, University of Toronto Mississauga – Urbanization drives parallel adaptive clines in plant populations

Poster presentation:

First place: Hayley Alloway, Memorial University – Physiological evidence for alternative reproductive strategies in men

Second place: Jesse Hoage, Laurentian University- Developing a metabarcoding strategy for soil mesofaunal communities to monitor the ecological impacts of intensified biomass harvesting in forestry

Diversity and excellence in graduate research (new in 2016!)

Stilianos Louca, University of British Columbia – The ecology of microbial metabolic pathways

Diana Rennison, University of British Columbia – Survival in a cutthroat world: Estimating natural selection on armor phenotypes and genotypes in threespine stickleback

Rachel Germain, University of Toronto – The spatial structure of metacommunities: a multiscale decoupling of distance and environment

Kyle Artelle, Simon Fraser University – Ecology of Conflict: Bear-human conflict in British Columbia, and the role of science in wildlife management

Krista Oke, McGill University – (Non) Parallel evolution in fishes: investigating potential drivers of non-parallelism in stickleback and salmon

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Early Career Awards 2017 – call for applications

Deadline for receipt of all application materials: 13 January 2017

Award Description: The CSEE Early Career Awards recognize outstanding accomplishments and promising future research potential in ecology and evolution by scientists early in their career. Awards will be given to two candidates each year. They consist of a 10-year membership to CSEE/SCEE, $500 cash award, up to $1000 allowance for travel and accommodation to attend the CSEE meeting in Victoria, B.C., and an invitation to give a keynote lecture at the annual meeting.

Eligibility: Applicants must be active researchers in the field of ecology and evolutionary biology who received their doctorate within five years of the application deadline, not including time taken for parental leave (i.e., one year of parental leave extends the eligibility period to six years post-Ph.D.). Candidates need to be Canadian citizens, or landed immigrants, or have completed their PhD at a Canadian University, or be currently working at a Canadian University.

Application/Nomination Procedures: Candidates may apply directly or may be nominated.  Established researchers are encouraged to nominate outstanding young scientists.  Nominations must contain all of the following supporting materials in the stated order: (1) a curriculum vitae, (2) a summary of research accomplishments (maximum 2 pages), (3) a 2-page statement of research plans for the next 5 years, (4) three recent publications, (5) names and addresses of 3 referees (including the nominating scientist where applicable) who will provide supporting letters. The 3 letters of reference should be sent separately from the candidate’s nomination package. All nomination materials and reference letters must be sent as PDFs to the chair of the CSEE Awards committee, Mark Vellend (mark.vellend@usherbrooke.ca).

Time lines: The deadline for receipt of all materials including letters of reference is 13 January 2017. The recipients will be notified of the award in February and they will receive their award at the following annual meeting.

Download this information as a PDF document: csee-early-career-award-en-2017

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2015 Student Awards at Saskatoon

CSEE Talk 1st prize: Patrick Thompson – McGill, “Anatomy of the collapse and onset of recovery in the North Atlantic groundfish community.”

CSEE New Phytologist Prize: James Santangelo – University of Toronto, “Fungal endophytes of red fescue (Festuca rubra) increase host survival but reduce plant tolerance to simulated herbivory.”

CSEE Talk 2nd prize: Matthew Osmond – UBC, “Crossing fitness-valleys without the help of Mendel: extending theory.”

CSEE Talk 3rd prize – tie: Mallory Van Wyngaarden – Memorial University, “Population connectivity and environmental drivers of adaptation in the sea scallop, Placopecten magellanicus.”

CSEE Talk 3rd prize – tie: Carly Graham – University of Regina, “How degraded is too degraded? The effects of DNA quality on RADSeq in molecular ecology.”

 

CSEE Poster 1st prize: Zoryana Shibel – University of New Brunswick, “Synergistic and additive effects of water stress and clipping on S. altissima and S.gigantea.”

CSEE Poster 2nd prize: Marion Sinclair-Waters – Dalhousie University, “Genomic tools for the management of a marine protected area in coastal Labrador: the Gilbert Bay Atlantic Cod MPA.”

 

Honorable mentions – Oral presentations

Clayton Lamb – University of Alberta, “Grizzly bear demography in a region of rich fruit resources and high human-caused mortality.”

Sean Naman – UBC, “Habitat structure and functional traits mediate emigration of stream invertebrates following high and low flow disturbances.”

Clément Rougeux – Université Laval, “Demographic divergence history of American whitefish species pairs inferred from genome-wide SNPs.”

Julia Shonfield – University of Alberta, “Do owls avoid industrial noise sources in northeastern Alberta?”

Cora Skaien – UBC, “Spatial Heterogeneity in Selection Pressure Exerted by Ungulate Herbivores on the Morphology and Life History of Plectritis congesta.”

Jess Vickruck – Brock University, “Population structure of the Eastern Carpenter bee (Xylocopa virginica) across eastern North America.”

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2016 Early Career Awards

The CSEE Early Career Awards recognize outstanding accomplishments and promising future research potential in ecology and evolution by scientists early in their careers. There were many excellent nominees for the ECAs this year, and the selection committee had a hard time picking just two. The recipients for this year’s competition were Dr. Isla Myers-Smith, currently at the University of Edinburgh, and Dr. Njal Rollinson from the University of Toronto. The 2016 award consisted of a ten-year membership to CSEE, a $500 cash award, up to $1000 allowance for travel and accommodation to attend the CSEE meeting in St. John’s, Newfoundland, and an invitation to give a keynote lecture there. Dr. Rollinson presented an ECA talk entitled “Maternal effects and the evolution of body size.” Dr. Myers-Smith was unable to physically attend the meeting but she sent a video presentation entitled “The greening of the Arctic: climate as a driver of tundra vegetation change.”

Congratulations again to both recipients, and thanks to the adjudicators for their hard work (Mélanie Jean, Jeremy Kerr, Locke Rowe, Mark Vellend and Jeannette Whitton).

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