PhD in Ecology of mixed strain infections in the Lyme disease pathogen, Department of Veterinary Microbiology, WCVM, University of Saskatchewan

Position: One PhD position is available in an NSERC-funded research lab at the University of Saskatchewan to investigate the ecological factors that maintain the strain diversity of Borrelia burgdorferi, the tick-borne pathogen that causes Lyme disease (LD). We will use experimental infections with a lab LD system (mice, ticks) to determine how interactions between different B. burgdorferi strains inside the vertebrate host and the tick vector influence the transmission and fitness of this multi-strain tick-borne pathogen.

Location: The University of Saskatchewan is one of the 15 top research universities in Canada. The WCVM is the premiere veterinary school in Western Canada and has state-of-the-art facilities. The faculty in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology are biologists and veterinarians who study pathogens and parasites across a wide range of biological disciplines (molecular biology, physiology, and ecology). The Voordouw Tick & Lyme Lab has research funding from NSERC and the SHRF.

Job requirements: The position requires an independent, highly motivated, enthusiastic, and scientifically curious individual with a strong background in any of the following fields: infectious diseases, microbiology, immunology, ecology, or evolutionary biology. Molecular techniques (qPCR, ELISA, Western Blots), experience working with rodents, statistical data analysis skills and writing skills are useful. The applicant must have a Master’s degree. Successful students are expected to be competitive and apply for a diversity of internal scholarships.

Start date: The position is available as early as May 2020. The salary is set by the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and the University of Saskatchewan College of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Application requirements: Please submit: (1) a 1-2-page cover letter indicating your research interests and why you are interested in the position, (2) your CV (including a list of publications), (3) University transcripts, and (4) two letters of reference. Submit your complete application package via email to: maarten.voordouw@usask.ca. The application deadline is 31 December 2019 (or until the position is filled).

Professor Maarten J. Voordouw
Department of Veterinary Microbiology
WCVM, University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

Visit our website: https://researchers.usask.ca/maarten-voordouw/

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Fully funded MSc in Geography: Marine Habitat Mapping in Coastal Labrador.

We seek an M.Sc. student for a marine habitat mapping project in coastal Labrador, beginning in May, 2020.  This project will work with both new multibeam sonar data as well as previously existing data from the Canadian Hydrographic Service and from previous ArcticNet mapping studies in coastal bays of central and northern Labrador. Three research questions will lie at the centre of this project. 1) What benthic habitats do two focal fish species, Arctic charr and rock cod, occupy? 2) What high biodiversity and/or sensitive habitats are found in nearshore waters of Nunatsiavut and Northern Labrador, and where do these occur? 3) How similar or different are the benthic habitats and species found in coastal bays of Nunatsiavut vs. those in adjacent biogeographic regions. This project will be in cooperation with the government of Nunatsiavut and Fisheries & Oceans Canada.  Required skills include a quantitative background in geomorphology, ecology or marine biology and familiarity with a programming language (e.g. R), previous experience acquiring or processing acoustic or video data will be considered a strong asset.

For more information, please contact Evan Edinger (eedinger@mun.ca) or Katleen Robert (Katleen.robert@mi.mun.ca) with a CV and a cover letter stating your main research interests.

Closing date: January 15, 2020

Prospective start date: May 2020

Please visit: https://www.mi.mun.ca/graduateopportunities/

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PDF POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT

Postdoctoral Fellow position available in invasion ecology with Drs. Hugh MacIsaac and Sarah Bailey. We seek candidates for a position to address risk assessment associated with colonization pressure in aquatic invasion ecology. The successful applicant will review pertinent literature, assess risk associated with mock zooplankton communities in experimental mesocosms, and model relative risk associated with colonization pressure and propagule pressure in ballast water communities. Appointment is initially available for one year, with renewal contingent on funding.

Applicants must possess a PhD in plankton ecology and/or invasion ecology, a strong publication record, and strong quantitative and verbal skills.  Experience working with large data sets, and on collaborative projects with multiple stakeholders is beneficial.

The position is based primarily at GLIER with Hugh MacIsaac, though some work and analyses will occur with Sarah Bailey at Fisheries and Oceans Canada in Burlington, Ontario.

Applications should include a cover letter, c.v., statement of research interests, and the names of two references. Application materials should be directed to Dr. Hugh MacIsaac at aquaticexplorer@yahoo.com.

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Ph.D. or M.Sc. opportunity, Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB.

Dr. Jane Waterman is looking for graduate students to study questions related to the behaviour, ecology and physiology of African ground squirrels. This research focuses on testing hypotheses about the evolution of social behaviour using a combination of behavioral, physiological and molecular techniques, including access to our longterm database of trapping, genetic and behavioural data. Possible projects include the influence of parasites on survival and reproduction, male alloparental care and associated hormones, dispersal and a genomic perspective on adaptive behaviours. The social systems of this African species is unique because males form amicable all-male social groups that persist throughout the year and females live in kin groups with cooperative breeding. The project in Africa requires students to spend time at a field site in South Africa. Experience with laboratory techniques and field work would be an advantage. More information can be found at (https://www.watermanlab.com/). Completion of an MSc degree is preferred for the PhD, but students with a BSc degree and a strong academic record will also be considered. Interested applicants should email a CV, unofficial transcripts, and a biref statement of research interests to Dr. Jane Waterman (jane.waterman@umanitoba.ca). Starting date: Spring-Fall 2020.

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Ph.D. or M.Sc. opportunity, Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB.

Dr. Jane Waterman is looking for graduate students to study questions related to the behaviour, ecology and physiology of African ground squirrels. This research focuses on testing hypotheses about the evolution of social behaviour using a combination of behavioral, physiological and molecular techniques, including access to our longterm database of trapping, genetic and behavioural data. Possible projects include the influence of parasites on survival and reproduction, male alloparental care and associated hormones, dispersal and a genomic perspective on adaptive behaviours. The social systems of this African species is unique because males form amicable all-male social groups that persist throughout the year and females live in kin groups with cooperative breeding. The project in Africa requires students to spend time at a field site in South Africa. Experience with laboratory techniques and field work would be an advantage. More information can be found at (https://www.watermanlab.com/). Completion of an MSc degree is preferred for the PhD, but students with a BSc degree and a strong academic record will also be considered. Interested applicants should email a CV, unofficial transcripts, and a biref statement of research interests to Dr. Jane Waterman (jane.waterman@umanitoba.ca). Starting date: Spring-Fall 2020.

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PhD position on cross-ecosystem spatial dynamics, Université de Montréal, Canada

Starting Date: Between Spring and Fall 2020

This project is offered in co-supervision between the Université de Montréal’s Meta-Ecology lab (led by Eric Harvey) and the aquatic ecology lab (Beatrix Beisner, UQAM).

We are looking for a doctoral student to conduct experimental research (in aquatic mesocosms) on the dynamics of the coupling between ecosystems. We want to better understand how variations in frequency / magnitude and quantity / quality of resource flows influence the structure of biotic communities and the functioning of the ecosystems that receive these pulses of nutrients.

Several anthropogenic disturbances can potentially influence the dynamics of resource flows between ecosystems (climate change, agriculture, forest management). This project will therefore eventually anticipate some of these changes and help to better understand how a very localized disturbance can potentially have ramifications and cascading impacts across a whole landscape.

It should be noted that several projects are possible depending on the specific interests of the candidate. The student will be part of the GRIL (Groupe Interuniversitaire en Limnologie), a group of researchers in freshwater ecology. As a GRIL student member, the candidate will have access to several training opportunities, the expertise of 53 researchers and 175 colleagues as well as an annual symposium.

Qualifications: Candidates should have a MSc in biology or related discipline. Existing zooplankton, macro invertebrates or protist identification and counting skills are an advantage, but more generally curiosity and willingness to learn is most important.

Stipend: Salary of $18 000 to $21 000 per year for 3 years; applicants should also plan to apply for other scholarships (e.g., NSERC and FRQNT).

To apply: Interested applicants should send their CV and a cover letter outlining their research interests to eric.harvey@umontreal.ca

To learn more about the philosophy of the lab, please visit our website: http://www.metecolab.orgPhD position on cross-ecosystem spatial dynamics, Université de Montréal, Canada

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Tenured or tenure-track Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Wildlife Biology, WILFRID LAURIER UNIVERSITY, FACULTY OF SCIENCE, DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

The Department of Biology at Wilfrid Laurier University invites applications for a tenured or tenure-track Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Wildlife Biology. The Canada Research Chairs Program is a key component of a strategy to make Canada one of the world’s top countries in research and development (www.chairs-chaires.gc.ca).

Tier 2 Canada Research Chairs are intended for exceptional emerging researchers; candidates typically must be within 10 years of obtaining their PhD. However, it is recognized that career breaks due to personal leaves can have legitimate impacts on an applicant’s record of research achievements. Applicants who are more than 10 years from having earned their highest degree and have had career breaks due to maternity, parental or extended sick leaves, family care or other similar reasons may still be eligible and are encouraged to apply. Eligibility can be assessed through the program’s Tier 2 justification process. Please consult the CRC website for details about eligibility or contact Charity Parr-Vasquez (cparrvasquez@wlu.ca), Director of the Office of Research Services, for more information.

The Chair will provide leadership and expertise in the field of wildlife biology by using a variety of approaches to study conservation biology and management or ecology in northern ecosystems. A research focus on key northern species (e.g. ungulates), that can be linked to priorities in Indigenous communities and food security issues would be an asset. The successful applicant will add capacity and new areas of expertise to the strategic northern research focus that already exists at Laurier, and to Laurier’s Environment research cluster, which is one of the areas of research strength identified in Laurier’s Strategic Research Plan. Much of the northern research conducted at Laurier contributes to the longstanding partnership with the Government of the Northwest Territories (2009-2029), and is affiliated with the Cold Regions Research Centre and the Laurier Institute for Water Science. The successful candidate will have a demonstrated capacity to develop an externally funded, world-class research program. They will be expected to secure external funding, including Tri-Agency grants, and to contribute to the training and mentorship of graduate and undergraduate students through their research program. The candidate is also expected to have demonstrated teaching proficiency and to make contributions to undergraduate teaching in Biology that align with their expertise. They will also contribute to teaching, supervision and mentoring in our graduate programs, and will participate in the administrative activities of the department.

The Department of Biology is a dynamic part of the Faculty of Science, with leading researchers in many fields and a commitment to building collaborative interdisciplinary research partnerships to address complex and diverse issues. The department offers undergraduate degrees in Biology, Applied Water Science, and Environmental Science, along with a MSc program in Integrative Biology and a PhD program in Biological and Chemical Sciences (in conjunction with the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry). Departmental faculty have a growing complement of research programs that contribute to the university’s strengths in cold regions and water science research. The Chair will have access to Laurier’s well established and world-class infrastructure network of long-term, multidisciplinary living laboratories throughout the continental Northwest Territories that help to foster dynamic and productive collaborative research programs. Additionally, the Chair will be supported by substantial lab infrastructure in the Centre for Cold Regions and Water Science (CCRWS), and the Laurier Science Research Centre.

Qualifications

To be considered, applicants must have a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences, or a related discipline, and relevant postdoctoral experience. Applicants may currently hold an Assistant or Associate Professor position, or have the qualifications necessary to be appointed at one of these levels. The successful candidate will be nominated for a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair and will be appointed as a tenured or tenure-track faculty member at the Assistant or Associate Professor level in the Department of Biology, conditional on CRC application approval.

How to Apply

Applicants should submit a cover letter outlining their qualifications for the position, a curriculum vitae, a research statement, a two-page teaching statement outlining teaching philosophy, experience and interests, PDF copies of up to three scholarly publications that demonstrate contributions to the field, and the contact information of three referees willing to provide a letter of reference. Application packages should be submitted electronically to Dr. Matt Smith, Chair, Department of Biology, Wilfrid Laurier University (bioadmin@wlu.ca). Applications will be accepted until January 3, 2020. The anticipated start date is July 1, 2020 (or later), subject to the successful candidate’s availability and the timeline for the Tier 2 CRC nomination process.

The impact of leaves (e.g. parental leave, extended leaves due to illness, etc.) will be carefully considered when reviewing candidates’ eligibility and record of research achievement. Therefore, candidates are encouraged to explain in their cover letter how career interruptions may have impacted them. Diversity and creating a culture of inclusion is a key pillar of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Strategic Academic Plan and is one of Laurier’s core values. Laurier is committed to increasing the diversity of faculty and staff and welcomes applications from candidates who identify as Indigenous, racialized, having disabilities, and from persons of any sexual identities and gender identities. Indigenous candidates who would like to learn more about equity and inclusive programing at Laurier are welcomed to contact the Office of Indigenous Initiatives at jbecker@wlu.ca. Candidates from other equity seeking groups who would like to learn more about equity and inclusive programing at Laurier are welcomed to contact Equity and Accessibility at equity@wlu.ca.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, per Canadian immigration laws, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. To comply with the Government of Canada’s reporting requirements, the University is obligated to gather information about applicants’ status as either Permanent Residents of Canada or Canadian citizens. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or current citizenship(s); however, all applicants must include one of the following statements in their cover letter:

I am a current citizen or permanent resident of Canada;
I am not a current citizen or permanent resident of Canada

In keeping with Laurier’s best practices in recruitment and in accordance with the Canadian Research Chairs Requirements for Recruitment Guidelines, applicants are encouraged to complete the applicant equity survey. For more information on Laurier’s CRC equity, diversity and inclusion commitments, please visit the Laurier’s CRC Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan.

Laurier strives to make our application process accessible and provides accommodations for both applicants and employees as outlined in Policy 8.7. If you require assistance applying for this position, would like this job posting in an alternative format, or would like to discuss accessibility and accommodations during the recruitment process please contact Laurier’s Equity and Accessibility Officer at accessibility@wlu.ca. 

The Faculty of Science wishes to thank all applicants for their interest. All applications shall be reviewed and considered under the criteria established by the Search Committee and a short list of candidates shall be interviewed. Only those applicants selected for the short list will be contacted.

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Graduate Research Opportunity, Aquatic Carbon Biogeochemistry in Boreal Aquatic Ecosystems

Start date: Summer – Winter / Spring 2020

Location: Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada

Several graduate assistantships are available to carry out Master’s or Ph.D. theses in the Aquatic Ecology Group of the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQÀM). The projects will be associated to the NSERC-funded Chair in Carbon Biogeochemistry in Boreal Aquatic Systems (CarBBAS). The research projects may focus on a wide range of issues related to C biogeochemistry and greenhouse gas dynamics in northern aquatic ecosystems, including lake and river organic carbon dynamics and processing, greenhouse gas dynamics, and ecosystem metabolism; links between aquatic and terrestrial C biogeochemistry and ecosystem function; the role of aquatic ecosystems on regional carbon budgets; greenhouse gas dynamics in hydroelectric reservoirs and the C footprint of hydroelectric power generation. The projects will likely involve a combination of approaches, including in situ point and continuous gas, chemical and physical measurements, optical, isotopic and chemical characterization of organic matter, a wide range of process measurements, GIS and landscape modeling measurements, and molecular microbial techniques. The research favors an integrative, network scale perspective of inland waters across the boreal biome of Québec, but comparative work in temperate and subarctic systems in Québec and elsewhere will also be carried out. The candidate will join the highly dynamic, diverse and multidisciplinary team of the NSERC-funded Industrial Research Chair in Carbon Biogeochemistry in Boreal Aquatic Systems (http://www.carbbas.uqam.ca/), which in turn is part of a aquatic group in the Département des sciences biologiques of the UQAM, with collective expertise in nutrient and C biogeochemistry, ecosystem and landscape modeling, population, community and ecosystem ecology, genomics and molecular ecology. The UQÀM is a francophone university, but English is the working language in the group, our students can choose to take courses in our sister universities and can submit their theses in English. Interested students should send a letter of introduction, academic resume, and the names of two references, to Paul del Giorgio (del_giorgio.paul@uqam.ca, 514-7957983). E-mail enquiries and applications are welcome. Starting date: Winter-Spring 2020.

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PhD: Evaluation of the factors affecting tree vulnerability in a context of assisted migration: an approach by key functional traits

Due to climate change, it is anticipated that current tree populations will be exposed to very different environmental conditions from the current conditions. Assisted migration is a potential management strategy, but the planted trees are confronted with more rigorous conditions, especially during their early establishment phase. We have established an experiment in the Quebec mixed forest to better understand vulnerability of trees planted for assisted migration. Nine thousand seedlings of 9 different species and 3 provenances representing current climate, that of 2050 and of 2080, were planted and subject to treatments testing different abiotic and biotic constraints : microclimate, herbivory (exclosures) and vegetation competition. We are seeking a PhD candidate interested in working on this unique site with a team of researchers from Quebec and the United States (USDA). The project includes three dimensions : 1) monitoring of phenological traits; 2) herbivory : evaluation of the risk of predation as a function of species and provenance and 3) functional traits : measure of key traits and their plasticity across species and provenances. The project is supervised by a multi-disciplinary team: Jean-Pierre Tremblay (Jean-Pierre.Tremblay@bio.ulaval.ca) and Alison Munson from Université Laval, and Patricia Raymond from the Quebec Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks.

We are offering a fellowship of 21000 $/yr for three years. The candidate should have a Masters or MSc in biology or forest sciences (or be completing a degree). We are looking for qualities of autonomy, curiosity, science communication skills (written and oral). Please send your CV, your recent marks, a letter of motivation and a list of 2-3 references who can be contacted, for November 15th, 2019.

Pour en savoir plus : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iTHoc2ZST4

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PhD project on Canada lynx population dynamics at Kluane Lake, Yukon

The Integrative Wildlife Conservation lab at Trent University is initiating a PhD project on lynx population dynamics and foraging ecology near Kluane Lake, Yukon. Our research on lynx and their prey in the Kluane region spans decades, and the current project builds on our recent work assessing the functional response of lynx to different prey types and how such relationships are more complex than previously thought (see Chan et al. 2017, Ecology DOI:10.1002/ecy.1828). Specifically, through lynx GPS telemetry and accelerometry, and assessment of prey distribution and abundance, we aim to understand the mechanisms driving population dynamics of lynx and their primary (snowshoe hare) and secondary (red squirrel) prey species across space and time. We have studied lynx intensively for 4 winters during a period of hare abundance at Kluane, so the ongoing cyclic crash in hare numbers presents a fascinating opportunity to assess variation in lynx foraging behavior and the dynamic drivers of their relationships with prey. This research project likely will extend into largely unexplored realms including lynx foraging ecology in summer and the role of intraspecific competition on the structure of their functional responses. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop specific research questions within the scope of the larger project.

Successful candidates will have an MSc in Ecology, Conservation Biology, or related field, demonstrated evidence of peer-reviewed publications, strong field and quantitative skills, and an interest in working collaboratively within a large and diverse research group. Additional desirable skills include animal handling, GPS telemetry, remote sensing and GIS analysis, and working in remote field conditions, including during winter.  For additional details, see www.dennismurray.ca and www.ualberta.ca/science/about-us/contact-us/faculty-directory/stan-boutin.

To apply, send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, unofficial academic transcript, and contact information for 3 references to: Dennis Murray (murraylabapplicants@gmail.com).

The position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate is found.

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