2017 Early Career Awards

The CSEE Early Career Awards recognize outstanding accomplishments and promising future research potential in ecology and evolution by scientists early in their careers. We are delighted to announce that the recipients for the 2017 awards are Dr. Emily Darling, from the University of Toronto and the Wildlife Conservation Society, and Dr. Sean Anderson, from the University of Washington. We look forward to hearing their plenary talks at the CSEE meeting in Victoria.

Congratulations to both recipients, and hats off to all candidates for the very high calibre of their submissions.

Dr Emily Darlingedarling

Emily is a community ecologist and conservation biologist who is motivated to understand how human activities are altering coastal and marine ecosystems. Her research focuses on three interrelated themes: quantifying interactions between multiple stressors and the prevalence of ecological synergies, coral life histories and trajectories of community change on coral reefs, and managing marine ecosystems for resilience to climate change. Her work integrates multiple approaches, ranging from literature reviews, meta-analyses, and statistical analyses of long-term monitoring data, to quantitative field experiments and socio-economic surveys to understand the complex ecological dynamics of coastal systems.

 

sandersonDr Sean Anderson

Sean is a quantitative population biologist who links theory with data through statistical and simulation models to improve predictions about ecological systems and inform management and policy decisions. In particular, he is interested in how we can estimate population status with limited data and in the role of variance, risk, and extreme events in population dynamics. Because these problems are complex, a large part of his research involves method and software development and is often highly collaborative. His work spans across taxa (e.g. birds, moths, grizzly bears, sea cucumbers, salmon), ecosystems (marine, freshwater, terrestrial), methods (empirical, simulation, theoretical), spatial scale (regional, national, global), and time periods (modern, historical, paleontological).

 

 

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